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I wrote the following code to input numbers from a file however the last number gets printed twice which I find perplexing. What could be the possible answer. Thanks in advance.

code:

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int x;
    ifstream f;
    f.open("note");
    while(!f.eof()){
            f>>x;
            cout<<x<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

gives output:

1
2
3
4
5
5

the contents of file note are:

1
2
3
4
5 
share|improve this question
    
I compiled it and it works fine. Are you sure the last '5' is not printed from somewhere else –  Mojo Risin Mar 12 '11 at 11:31
    
@Mojo It shouldn't work fine unless you have no whitespace, not even a newline, after the 5. –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 11:55
    
@Frustrated Coder: The solution you picked should not work under any situation. It is just plain wrong. –  Loki Astari Mar 12 '11 at 12:47
    
It gets the right result if the '5' is the last byte in the file ... but of course that doesn't change the fact that it's wrong. –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 14:57
    
@Frustrated Coder You have accepted an incorrect answer. Please remedy that. –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 14:58
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Every solution so far presented has a good explanation of why the OP code is wrong. But most have the incorrect solution to the problem.

As stated many times before the EOF flag is not set until you try and read past the end of file. The last successful read may read up-to (inclusive) the last character. So in your case the last read will read the 5 from the file and then print it. We then renter enter the loop (which will work because the last read did not read past the end of file and thus EOF is false). Your attempt to read the next character will fail at f >> x and the variable 'x' will be left untouched (in your code this means it has the last value read a 5) and is then printed.

The solution is to test the condition of the stream after you have done the read to make sure it works. Note: You should not exclusively test for EOF there are other bad states. If one of the other bad states is entered the current code will enter an infinite loop. To check for all bad bits call fail() on the object. So the easiest solution is to put the read into the while test ( see below )

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int x;
    ifstream f;
    f.open("note");
    while(f>>x)
    {
            cout<<x<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

This works because the >> operator returns a stream. When a stream object is used in a boolean context it is converted into a type than can represent true/false (for technical reasons this is not bool but you can think of it as a bool). The value returned depends on the state of the stream. If the stream is in a good state then it will (in a boolean context) evaluate to true thus allowing the loop to be entered, if the stream object is in an invalid state (ie EOF (or other failed state) is true) then it will evaluate to false and the loop is not entered.

Note: The conversion actually calls fail() on the stream to test the state.

If your code is complex and you can not test the state as part of the read. Then after each read you MUST test the state of the object to verify it worked.

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int x;
    ifstream f;
    f.open("note");
    while(f)
    {
            f>>x;
            if (f) // dont' use f.eof() there are other bad states.
            {      // This will actuall call f.fail() which test for all bad states.
                   // Thus it only prints if the read worked.

                  cout<<x<<endl;
            }
            // Alternatively you can put the read into the if
            if ( f >> x)
            {
                  // STUFF
            }
    }
    return 0;
}

In response to Jim's comments.
Once a number has been read from the stream with the >> operator. No other characters are read. TO show this is true try the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::ifstream  file("txt");
    std::string    line;
    int            x;

    while(f >> x)
    {
        std::getline(f, line);   // If the '\n' was read then
                                 // this code would remove the next line.
                                 // As it works correctly it simply removes then
                                 // characters upto the newline character after the number.
        std::cout << x << "\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's funny, Martin. You gave exactly the same solution I did (but without the extra braces). Please sharpen up your reading comprehension skills. –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 12:29
    
@Martin I see that you have deleted your comments about my solution ... except for the one that says "NONE have the correct solution to the problem" ... please edit that. –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 12:38
    
@Jim: Your code works but your comments are still wrong. Please re-read in relation to <quote>It reads '5' and then '\n'</quote> –  Loki Astari Mar 12 '11 at 12:41
    
@Martin If the '5' is followed by a '\n' then that indeed is what it will do. Of course, the '5' could be followed by some other non-digit, but it isn't in this case. Also, your comment here says that every answer has given a good explanation but a wrong solution -- that is clearly mistaken. –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 12:45
    
@jim: No. It will stop after reading the 5. The '\n' is not removed from the stream (so it works even if there are zero characters after the 5). Correct your mistakes and I will be happy to up-vote you. But not while there are factual errors in your answer. –  Loki Astari Mar 12 '11 at 12:49
show 7 more comments

This is because EOF flag is only set when you have tried to read past the EOF. (It's an error flag)

So you better test f.eof() at the end of your loop.

share|improve this answer
1  
The comment is correct but the solution is wrong. why does this have the tick. –  Loki Astari Mar 12 '11 at 12:11
    
@Martin because the OP doesn't know that it's wrong, of course. I explained in my answer why it's wrong. (You said my answer is wrong as well, but you gave no reason and I believe that you are incorrect. Please be more detailed in your comments.) –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 12:26
    
@Jim: Fixed my comment. Your solution is correct. –  Loki Astari Mar 12 '11 at 12:37
    
I think the compiler sees '\0' as the end of the file and once it encounters that it sets flag eof . I tried this while(!f.eof()) { f>>x; if(x!='\0'){ cout<<x<<endl;} } return 0; } and it worked perfectly fine! –  Frustrated Coder Mar 12 '11 at 16:45
    
@Frustrated Coder: You were lucky is why it worked. The content of x after a failure to read is undefined. –  Loki Astari Mar 12 '11 at 19:19
add comment

Let me try to be a bit more illuminating than the previous answers here. f>>x reads an integer so it scans the input for digits. It sees '5' and then '\n', which is not a digit, so it stops after the '5' and sets x to 5. It has not yet encountered eof, your loop executes again, then f>>x reads the '\n' and then fails when it hits eof, leaving x unchanged, and you then print 5 again. So, you need to test after reading and before printing. The simplest (and preferred) way to do that is

while(f>>x)
    cout<<x<<endl;

You should not do something like

do{
    f>>x;
    cout<<x<<endl;
}while(!f.eof());

(which does not test after reading and before printing) because that results in undefined behavior if the input file does not contain any numbers -- x is unitialized and you'll print garbage (or possibly blow up the world, but probably not).

share|improve this answer
    
@Martin Care to explain? The solution works, and is given in numerous textbooks ... so what's wrong with it, pray tell? –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 12:16
    
@Martin While you're readying your answer, think about what the value of f>>x is and what implicit conversions it has. –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 12:19
    
@Martin Of course my last read fails -- and the failure exits the while loop so no printing is done. Apparently you have done a poor job of reading my answer and have mistaken the code that I said should not be used as if it were my recommendation. –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 12:28
    
@Martin Thanks. Please be more careful before saying something's wrong. BTW, I just learned C++ two days ago (after about a decade of procrastinating). –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 12:33
    
The behavior is well defined, whatever the input file contains. Undefined Behavior has a very specific meaning in the standard and is only ever applicable to code constructs. In the second loop: If the input file is empty (or contain just white space) it will output the content of x (random number) once. If the input file contains any non numbers then the the second loop will go into an infinite loop (as the bad bit will be set reading the non integer, thus prevent any more reading from the stream and thus never being able to set the eof bit). –  Loki Astari Mar 12 '11 at 14:56
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