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I know that, in theory, you can not (and should not) derive static classes in C# but I have a case in which I think I need it... I wanted to define a number of static constants for class A and, as I quickly discovered, you can't do that so I followed this tutorial: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397677.aspx

So, I have a static class like this:

public static class ClassAConstants
{
    public const string ConstantA = "constant_a";
    public const string ConstantB = "constant_b";
}

Then, I have class B that extends class A and adds some new static constants. What I would like to do is this:

public static class ClassBConstants : ClassAConstants
{
    public const string ConstantC = "constant_c";
    public const string ConstantD = "constant_d";
}

This way, the four constants would be accessible with ClassBConstants.ConstantA or ClassBConstants.ConstantD. However, C# won't let me do it.

How can I achieve this? Perhaps the solution is totally different, I don't care if it does not use static constants at all as long as the result is what I want.


EDIT:

Thanks to Amby I discovered that constants are implicitly static so I really didn't need to create that artificial static classes (ClassAConstants and ClassBConstants). The solution couldn't be simpler:

public class A
{
    public const string ConstantA = "constant_a";
    public const string ConstantB = "constant_b";

    // ...

}
public class B : A
{
    public const string ConstantC = "constant_c";
    public const string ConstantD= "constant_d";

    // ...

}

With that code I get the results I wanted initially.

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Singleton pattern can help if you really need that you'll have a static instance of a regular class –  Guillaume86 Mar 12 '11 at 13:31
    
ClassBConstants IS-A ClassBConstants? –  Ritch Melton Mar 12 '11 at 13:31
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Choose Singleton instead of static class. Then your class benefits from features available to a non-static class, and the user will just have to make the following changes:

ClassAConstants.ConstantA ... to

ClassAConstants.Instance.ConstantA

btw, if you are only insterested in consts, then the below code would also compile. And then you can access these constants from instance of these classes, or directly by using class name (like accessing static member).

public class ClassAConstants
{
    public const string ConstantA = "constant_a";
    public const string ConstantB = "constant_b";
}

public class ClassBConstants : ClassAConstants
{
    public const string ConstantC = "constant_c";
    public const string ConstantD = "constant_d";
}

Since, consts are implicitly static.

ClassAConstants.ConstantA .. works.

ClassBConstants.ConstantA .. works.

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"consts are implicitly static" Ok, that was really what I needed. If I declare the constants inside the classes, without the "static" it works exactly as I wanted initially. Thanks! –  miguelSantirso Mar 12 '11 at 14:09
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You cannot derive from static classes.

If both classes are under your control, you can always merge them (assuming this will not break other people's code).

If they are not, then why would you want to give the impression that class B contains functionality that it really does not?

Finally, if you really really want to go that route, one option is to copy/paste the static members from class A into class B. But personally I think that would be a bad call.

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Thankfully. Eeeep. –  Ritch Melton Mar 12 '11 at 13:31
2  
@Jon There are many reasons why a person could want to derive a static class. If I have ConstantsForVersion1 and ConstantsForVersion2, I could want to derive the V2 from the V1 if it's a superset. Being constants, I could simply copy them, but I could be lazy, and normally to repeate the same code twice is bad practice. –  xanatos Mar 12 '11 at 13:35
    
@xanatos: Sure, DRY is good. But not introducing unnecessary coupling is also good (random example: what if someone changed the constants for V1?). But +1 because you were a CLIPPER programmer; my first language on x86 was CLIPPER :) –  Jon Mar 12 '11 at 13:38
    
@xanatos - Are you really implementing an IS-A relationship here? Does derivation do anything? If you absolutely have to use a static class, in V2, why don't you just add the constants to the class? Does V1 somehow get built with V2 classes? –  Ritch Melton Mar 12 '11 at 13:39
    
@Ritch Clearly it isn't a "standard" IS-A relationship, because you can't instantiate a static class. It's Just a Bunch of Constants/Methods. It's more like an #include "v2.h" file that #include "v1.h" to make the code shorter and more readable. Without it, you would have to double check the v2 just to make sure it's a superset of v1. –  xanatos Mar 12 '11 at 13:45
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You can do like this:

public static class ClassAConstants
{
    public const string ConstantA = "constant_a";
    public const string ConstantB = "constant_b";
}

public static class ClassBConstants
{
    public static string ConstantA
    {
        get { return ClassAConstants.ConstantA; }
    }
    public static string ConstantB
    {
        get { return ClassAConstants.ConstantB; }
    }
    public const string ConstantC = "constant_c";
    public const string ConstantD = "constant_d";
}

But I don't think that you realy need to do it.

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You could always declare your classes as normal classes (non-static), and keep your public members static.

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