Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to come up with a generic way to pull an object by its Id in my repository. In my database, generally, all the IDs are primary keys and are of the type integer. There may be a case, down the road where that is not true, but I still want to maintain the same method for all objects. Here is what my Interface looks like now:

public interface IRepository<TE>
    {
        void Add(TE entity);
        void AddOrAttach(TE entity);
        void DeleteRelatedEntries(TE entity);
        void DeleteRelatedEntries(TE entity, ObservableCollection<string> keyListOfIgnoreEntites);
        void Delete(TE entity);
        int Save();

        //this is where I am stuck
        TE GetById();

    }

I have seen some code out there where reflection is used to get the ID of an object then parse all objects for that speicifc object (not ideal). I have also seen somethng like this:

TE GetById(Expression<Func<TE, bool>> predicate);

I got that idea from here.

I am not realy familiar with expressions yet and not sure if this will work for me or not. I guess it would, becuase I could include this expression:

var foo = GetById(f => f.Id == 1);

But I suppose that isn't really GetById, but rather I could use any expression to get what I want, right?

Any thoughts would be appreicated.

share|improve this question
1  
Genuine question: do you know the difference between Expression<Func<T, bool>> and Func<T, bool>? You absolutely need to before going down this path. –  Jon Mar 12 '11 at 13:56
    
I really don't yet. ;) –  DDiVita Mar 12 '11 at 14:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, why is it a Repository<TE,TC> instead of a Repository<T>?

I use two methods:

 TE GetById(int id){`
     return _querySource.Single(x=>x.Id ==1);
 }

 IQueryable<TE> Query(Expression<Func<TE,bool>> predicate){
    return _querySource.Where(predicate);
 }

(I am assuming that you have an underlying IQueryable<TE> field and I named it _querySource for this example.)

share|improve this answer
    
TE is the entity and TC is the context. –  DDiVita Mar 12 '11 at 14:02
    
@DDiVita, Not a single member of the interface uses that parameter. It should be removed. If you are using multiple DataContext or ObjectContext types, then this should be in a class RepositoryBase<T,TContext>, but not part of the interface. –  smartcaveman Mar 12 '11 at 14:05
    
@DDiVita - mate, I wouldn't be passing in a Context to the IRepository. The context IS the instance of the IRepository. –  Pure.Krome Mar 12 '11 at 14:05
    
@Pure.Krome, I think he is using context to mean the DataContext or ObjectContext, in which case this could make sense in an abstract class (the repository is injected with the ObjectContext via the constructor), but not in the interface –  smartcaveman Mar 12 '11 at 14:07
    
I got the idea from here: codeproject.com/KB/database/ImplRepositoryPatternEF.aspx –  DDiVita Mar 12 '11 at 14:08

I generally just have:

public interface IRepository<T>
{
    ...
    T Load(object id);
}

I'd prefer to standardize on using the same type (int) for all primary keys, but if that's not possible, I'd use object and avoid the added complexity of a second generic parameter.

share|improve this answer

since TE is a generic class you can't do that .

you have to limit this TE generic to implement an interface that has property called [Id]

interface MainInterface
{
    Int ID{get;}
}

and in Reporsitory  :
public interface IRepository<TE, TC>  : where TE is MainInterface
    {
        void Add(TE entity);
        void AddOrAttach(TE entity);
        void DeleteRelatedEntries(TE entity);
        void DeleteRelatedEntries(TE entity, ObservableCollection<string> keyListOfIgnoreEntites);
        void Delete(TE entity);
        int Save();

        //this is where I am stuck
        TE GetById();

    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.