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Are there any methods to do so? I was looking but couldn't find any.

Another question: I need these methods so I can filter files. Some are AND filters and some are OR filters (like in set theory), so I need to filter according to all files and the unite/intersects ArrayLists that holds those files.

Should I use a different data structure to hold the files? Is there anything else that would offer a better runtime?

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8 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Here's a plain implementation without using any third-party library. Main advantage over retainAll, removeAll and addAll is that these methods don't modify the original lists input to the methods.

public class Test {

    public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {

        List<String> list1 = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList("A", "B", "C"));
        List<String> list2 = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList("B", "C", "D", "E", "F"));

        System.out.println(new Test().intersection(list1, list2));
        System.out.println(new Test().union(list1, list2));
    }

    public <T> List<T> union(List<T> list1, List<T> list2) {
        Set<T> set = new HashSet<T>();

        set.addAll(list1);
        set.addAll(list2);

        return new ArrayList<T>(set);
    }

    public <T> List<T> intersection(List<T> list1, List<T> list2) {
        List<T> list = new ArrayList<T>();

        for (T t : list1) {
            if(list2.contains(t)) {
                list.add(t);
            }
        }

        return list;
    }
}
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5  
you can create new list with list1 elements and then call retainAll, addAll methods –  smas Mar 12 '11 at 14:44
    
why you using strictfp in this solution? –  smas Mar 12 '11 at 14:47
    
@smas - it was straight from my laboratory, edited now :) –  adarshr Mar 12 '11 at 14:50
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Collection (so ArrayList also) have:

col.retainAll(otherCol) // for intersection
col.addAll(otherCol) // for union

Use a List implementation if you accept repetitions, a Set implementation if you don't:

Collection<String> col1 = new ArrayList<String>(); // {a, b, c}
// Collection<String> col1 = new TreeSet<String>();
col1.add("a");
col1.add("b");
col1.add("c");

Collection<String> col2 = new ArrayList<String>(); // {b, c, d, e}
// Collection<String> col2 = new TreeSet<String>();
col2.add("b");
col2.add("c");
col2.add("d");
col2.add("e");

col1.addAll(col2);
System.out.println(col1); 
//output for ArrayList: [a, b, c, b, c, d, e]
//output for TreeSet: [a, b, c, d, e]
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2  
There's been a suggested edit that this union "is incorrect since it will contain common elements twice". The edit recommended to use a HashSet instead. –  Kos Nov 30 '12 at 17:26
    
Actually it was edited, see: "Use a List implementation if you accept repetitions, a Set implementation if you don't:" –  smas Sep 12 '13 at 10:53
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Unions and intersections defined only for sets, not lists. As you mentioned.

Check guava library for filters. Also guava provides real intersections and unions

 static <E> Sets.SetView<E >union(Set<? extends E> set1, Set<? extends E> set2)
 static <E> Sets.SetView<E> intersection(Set<E> set1, Set<?> set2)
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List1.retainAll(List2) - is intersection

union will be removeAll and then addAll.

Find more in the documentation of collection(ArrayList is a collection) http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/Collection.html

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The solution marked is not efficient. It has a O(n^2). What we can do is to sort both lists, and the execute an intersection algorithm as the one below.

private  static ArrayList<Integer> interesect(ArrayList<Integer> f, ArrayList<Integer> s) { 
    ArrayList<Integer> res = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    int i = 0, j = 0; 
    while (i != f.size() && j != s.size()) { 

        if (f.get(i) < s.get(j)) {
            i ++;
        } else if (f.get(i) > s.get(j)) { 
            j ++;
        } else { 
            res.add(f.get(i)); 
            i ++;  j ++;
        }
    }


    return res; 
}

This one has a complexity of O(n log n + n) \in O(n \log n). The union is done in a similar manner. Just make sure you make the suitable modifications on the if-elseif-else statements.

You can also use iterators if you want (I know they are more efficient in C++, I dont know if this is true in Java as well).

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I think you should use a Set to hold the files if you want to do intersection and union on them. Then you can use Guava's Sets class to do union, intersection and filtering by a Predicate as well. The difference between these methods and the other suggestions is that all of these methods create lazy views of the union, intersection, etc. of the two sets. Apache Commons creates a new collection and copies data to it. retainAll changes one of your collections by removing elements from it.

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You can use CollectionUtils from apache commons.

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If you had your data in Sets you could use Google Collections: http://google-collections.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javadoc/com/google/common/collect/Sets.html

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There is no google collections anymore. Enjoy guava) –  Stas Kurilin Mar 12 '11 at 14:37
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