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I have a class as shown below:

class B;
class A
{
   public:
       A();
      ~A();
      void createStuff(.......); //??

  private:
      B *b;
};

The object B contains another of class 'C' which has about 20 class member variables.

I want the user of class A to be able to call the function createStuff(...) with a set of arguments so that I can construct the object C. What is the best way of doing this?

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How is C stored in B? –  Daniel Mar 12 '11 at 14:59
    
Yes, this isnt very clear, I may have jumped the gun with my answer. A contains B which contains C. Can "A" not access C? Can you be a little more clear or show some more code? –  Pete Mar 12 '11 at 15:01
    
The header file for B has the class definition of class C –  mikip Mar 12 '11 at 15:24
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4 Answers

The mechanism for classes to grant access to their private members is called friendship.

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With what you have posted it looks like something like this may work:

class B
class A:
{
   public:
       A();
      ~A();
      void ceateStuff(.......); //??

  private:
      B *b
}
void A::createStuff(argument1, argument2...)
{
    C = new C(argument1, argument2...) //You now have an instance of C with the arguments pass in to createStuff();

}

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Thanks Pete, however the class C constructor has 20 parameters. I was wondering if there was a better way of doing this –  mikip Mar 12 '11 at 15:16
1  
No, not really. The only way this would be possible is if A contains fields that can be used to create C. In that case you can pass only the necessary arguments and use the fields in A to create C. –  Pete Mar 12 '11 at 15:23
    
Well, I see you added a comment that B contains the definition for C. If that's the case then both B and C should be accessible from A and this method should work. –  Pete Mar 12 '11 at 15:34
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The variable of type C belongs to class B; it mediates the access to the data in C. Class B has constructors; you will use those to set the variable of class B in order, and it is B's job to ensure that the C is correctly managed.

If you need more control over C, then you have a design problem. Either your class A needs its own variable of class C to control, or class B does not provide the tools you need and needs fixing, or you are misguided in thinking you need access to, and therefore direct control over, the contents of the variable of class C.

The Law of Demeter is a guide in such scenarios; you seem to be wanting to contravene it.

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In any case you should look at B class, how it implement initialization of C object, can it be controlled (If can't - you should extend interface of class B and add this functionality)?

If C definition is accesible for A maybe you can use constructor of B in such way:

void A::createStuff( const C& c)
{
    b = new B(c); 
}
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