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I just spent quite a few hours reading up on TCP servers and my desired protocol I was trying to implement, and finally got everything working great. I noticed the code looks like absolute bollocks (is the the correct usage? Im not a brit) and would like some feedback on optimizing it, mostly for reuse and readability.

The packet formats are always int, int, int, string, string.

try
{
    BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(clientStream);
    int packetsize = reader.ReadInt32();
    int requestid = reader.ReadInt32();
    int serverdata = reader.ReadInt32();
    Console.WriteLine("Packet Size: {0} RequestID: {1} ServerData: {2}", packetsize, requestid, serverdata);

    List<byte> str = new List<byte>();
    byte nextByte = reader.ReadByte();

    while (nextByte != 0)
    {
        str.Add(nextByte);
        nextByte = reader.ReadByte();
    }

    // Password Sent to be Authenticated
    string string1 = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(str.ToArray());

    str.Clear();
    nextByte = reader.ReadByte();

    while (nextByte != 0)
    {
        str.Add(nextByte);
        nextByte = reader.ReadByte();
    }

    // NULL string
    string string2 = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(str.ToArray());

    Console.WriteLine("String1: {0} String2: {1}", string1, string2);

    // Reply to Authentication Request
    MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();
    BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(stream);

    writer.Write((int)(1)); // Packet Size
    writer.Write((int)(requestid)); // Mirror RequestID if Authenticated, -1 if Failed
    byte[] buffer = stream.ToArray();

    clientStream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
    clientStream.Flush();
}

I am going to be dealing with other packet types as well that are formatted the same (int/int/int/str/str), but different values. I could probably create a packet class, but this is a bit outside my scope of knowledge for how to apply it to this scenario. If it makes any difference, this is the Protocol I am implementing.

http://developer.valvesoftware.com/wiki/Source_RCON_Protocol

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2  
migrate to codereview.stackexchange.com ? –  k3b Mar 12 '11 at 16:01
    
You may want to check out ProtoBuf (code.google.com/p/protobuf-net), which lets you do efficient networking without all the plumbing code. –  Morten Mertner Mar 12 '11 at 16:05
    
@Morten - that is a very specific protocol, though; not RCON –  Marc Gravell Mar 12 '11 at 16:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first thing that jumps out to me is to always use the using statement with any object that implements IDisposable. This will ensure that your objects are properly disposed of even in the event of an exception.

private void FillList(BinaryReader reader, List list)
{
    while (reader.PeekChar() != -1)
    {
        list.Add(reader.ReadByte());
    }
}

...

try
{
    int packetsize, requestid, serverdata;
    string string1, string2;
    List<byte> str = new List<byte>();

    using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(clientStream))
    {
        packetsize = reader.ReadInt32();
        requestid = reader.ReadInt32();
        serverdata = reader.ReadInt32();
        Console.WriteLine("Packet Size: {0} RequestID: {1} ServerData: {2}", packetsize, requestid, serverdata);

        FillList(reader, str);

        // Password Sent to be Authenticated
        string1 = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(str.ToArray());

        str.Clear();
        FillList(reader, str);
    }

    // NULL string
    string2 = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(str.ToArray());

    Console.WriteLine("String1: {0} String2: {1}", string1, string2);

    // Reply to Authentication Request
    using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream())
    using (BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(stream))
    {

        writer.Write((int)(1)); // Packet Size
        writer.Write((int)(requestid)); // Mirror RequestID if Authenticated, -1 if Failed
        byte[] buffer = stream.ToArray();

        clientStream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
        clientStream.Flush();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is something I have been meaning to look up and didn't. When I was reading on C# I thought it auto disposed itself (I guess it does with using statements) but glad to know to use that now. Do you know if I could extract that while (nextByte != 0) block into its own function? In C++ I could just pass the reader object by reference, but I have no idea how to abstract the function in C#. –  Brett Powell Mar 12 '11 at 17:02
    
Sure. I've edited the example. –  john marsalis Mar 12 '11 at 17:43
    
Thank you so much! –  Brett Powell Mar 12 '11 at 18:59

Thoughts:

  • you arent really using the reader except for a few ints; otherwise, all you need is ReadByte you can do that from the Stream, and save some indirection/confusion
  • read the ints manually to avoid Endianness issues
  • reading byte by byte can be expensive; if possible, try to fill a buffer (or rather: read the right amount of data) by looping over Read rather that ReadByte
  • if multiple messages are coming down the same pipe, reading to EOF will probably fail (either corrupt the data or block forever); you usually need either a terminator sequence or a length-prefix. I prefer the latter, as it let's you use Read instead of ReadByte
  • I assume that is packetSize in your example; it is critical to use this: to separate the messages, to verify you have an entire message, and to deny over-sized data
  • consider whether async (BeginRead) is suitable - sometimes yes, sometimes no; and note that this makes disposal trickier as you can't use "using" with async
  • when using MemoryStream, using .GetBuffer() in combination with .Length has less overhead than using .ToArray()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, these are excellent points! –  Brett Powell Mar 12 '11 at 17:01

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