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I have a situation where I want to convert user supplied single page PDF's to black and white bitmaps in a suitable high resolution for further processing (eventually ending in a proprietary printing solution). All this must run in headless mode.

Due to policital and technical reasons this must be a pure Java library (i.e. no Ghostscript wrapper), and at this point in time we are interested in a royalty-free open source solution but where performance is not very important. If this project is successful we might need an upgrade path to a more performant proprietary library, but not now.

I have had a look around, and found that most PDF-library projects focus on either manipulating or viewing PDF's, but not as much on using it as a render engine - which is the only thing I need - and at least one engine has deliberately crippled the font engine in the Open Source version compared to the commercial version.

Hence, I need a recommendation for a PDF-library:

  • Render input files to bitmaps in headless mode.
  • All Java, no native code.
  • Renders all PDF-files commonly found in the wild (except invalid or incorrectly formatted ones)
  • is Open Source with a business friendly license.
  • is robust
  • is actively maintained
  • may be slow or not able to handle more than a few pages (more pages being a limitation lifted in the commercial version)

Suggestions?

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Please do not just mention projects, that can go in comments. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 12 '11 at 18:04
    
@Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen - I dwelled on that myself too and removed my post. T –  CoolBeans Mar 12 '11 at 18:23
    
One option is [apache PDFBox][pdfbox.apache.org/] and example [here][kickjava.com/src/org/pdfbox/PDFToImage.java.htm]. –  CoolBeans Mar 12 '11 at 18:24
    
Do you have actual experience with the packages you mention, and know first hand that they can do what I need? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 12 '11 at 18:31
    
I have used it for text extraction only and it worked fine for my purposes. But unfortunately not an expert on its inner details by any means. –  CoolBeans Mar 12 '11 at 19:06

4 Answers 4

There is no such library. Java libraries able to do correct rendering of embedded fonts are all commercial (I had to do an exhaustive search for a similar problem half a year ago).

I don't know the exact reasons, but believe that doing true type rendering of embedded fonts might somehow be protected due to licensing from adobe, which holds some patents on TrueType. At best it is just very hard to implement, so everyone who went through this wants some money for it. I have choosen PDFOne, because they are very cheap (~400$ for a single seat redist license), and relatively good. They still have problems with some encodings, but work for us.

I wouldn't go with java here anyway, but prefer to use ghostscript for its speed and robustness. But beware that if you don't use the library "on arms length", you will violate the GPL it is released in.

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1  
The Truetype font patents are no longer an issue. See jpedal.org/PDFblog/2010/08/… –  mark stephens Mar 13 '11 at 20:32

Your list is contradictory. The 'less limited' the license the less revenue there is to fun support and development. Which is more important to you? You can use Multivalent or PDFRenderer (which are very free but not supported) or IText, Icepdf or JPedal which have Open Source and commercial versions but actively developed because they have revenue streams.

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As I wrote I don't mind a commercial upgrade path to get e.g. faster prints or similar for high volume customers, but the entry point I'm looking for now, must work well too for low volumes. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 13 '11 at 16:11

Have you considered iText?

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Do you have actual experience with iText and know first hand that it can do what I need? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 12 '11 at 19:10
1  
The newest version of iText are NOT open sourced under a business friendly license. Older versions are. –  Brent Worden Mar 13 '11 at 4:54

have a look at icePDF and here

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