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I've been trying to get an efficient regex for IPv4 validation, but without much luck. It seemed at one point I had had it with (25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}, but it produces some strange results:

[chris@helios bashscripts]$ grep --version
grep (GNU grep) 2.7


[chris@helios bashscripts]$ grep -E '\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}\b' <<< 192.168.1.1
192.168.1.1
[chris@helios bashscripts]$ grep -E '\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}\b' <<< 192.168.1.255
192.168.1.255
[chris@helios bashscripts]$ grep -E '\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}\b' <<< 192.168.255.255
[chris@helios bashscripts]$ grep -E '\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}\b' <<< 192.168.1.2555
192.168.1.2555

I did a search to see if this had already been asked and answered, but other answers appear to simply show how to determine 4 groups of 1-3 numbers, or do not work for me.

Any ideas? Thanks!

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4  
Don't forget that A, and A.B, and A.B.C are valid forms of IP address as well as A.B.C.D. Seriously. Try ping 2130706433 and ping 127.1 for a giggle. – dty Mar 12 '11 at 17:47
1  
My variant online regexr.com/39hqf – Sllouyssgort Sep 22 '14 at 7:41
up vote 15 down vote accepted

You've already got a working answer but just in case you are curious what was wrong with your original approach, the answer is that you need parentheses around your alternation otherwise the (\.|$) is only required if the number is less than 200.

'\b((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)(\.|$)){4}\b'
    ^                                    ^
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1  
this appears to also validate things like 192.168.1.1.1 – cwd Aug 15 '14 at 19:28
    
^ My test case didn't match that, but did match "192.168.1.1." One possible fix would be instead of using word boundaries, start the regex with ^(?!.*\.$) and end with $. Or you could keep the boundaries with this lookahead (?!(.+\.){4} – Gary Oct 24 '14 at 14:00

^((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)$

Accept:

127.0.0.1
192.168.1.1
192.168.1.255
255.255.255.255
0.0.0.0
1.1.1.01

Reject:

30.168.1.255.1
127.1
192.168.1.256
-1.2.3.4
3...3

Try online with unit tests: https://www.debuggex.com/r/-EDZOqxTxhiTncN6/1

share|improve this answer
    
Take a look at debuggex.com You could add a graphic of your regex! – Daniel Brunner Sep 27 '14 at 19:26
    
what about "3...3" ip address ? 3...3 is accepted using this regex – Ankur Loriya Oct 6 '14 at 12:30
2  
I test it on regexr.com/39kqr, and 3...3 rejected – Sllouyssgort Oct 6 '14 at 16:32
    
What about 1.1.1.01? Is it considered a valid IPv4 address? Thanks. – odieatla Oct 8 '15 at 21:59
    
this regexp 1.1.1.01 consider as VALID IPv4 address. Online unit tests debuggex.com/r/-EDZOqxTxhiTncN6/1 – Sllouyssgort Oct 13 '15 at 7:54

Regex is not the tool for this job. It would be better to write a parser that separates the four numbers and checks that they are in the range [0,255]. The non-functional regex is already unreadable!

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1  
And something like awk -F'.' 'NF==4 && $1 > 0 && $1<256 && $2<256 && $3<256 && $4<256 && !/\.\./' is more readable? :P – Matthieu Cartier Mar 12 '11 at 17:32
4  
all regex is unreadable ;-) but that alone doesn't make it the wrong tool for the job. in fact I'd say regex is a perfectly good tool for an IP address validator. – Spudley Mar 12 '11 at 17:55
3  
@Spudley: There are perfectly readable regexes, e.g. /\w+/. The reason that regex doesn't fit is that this problem concerns itself with the meaning of the strings. Regexes are meant to recognize the form and not to compare numbers. – Tim Mar 12 '11 at 17:59
    
note the winking smiley... I wasn't being serious with 'all regex is unreadable'. I still think IP address is a reasonable use case for regex, but we'll have to agree to differ on that. – Spudley Mar 12 '11 at 18:09
    
@Spudley: I thought it was a malformed eye. Sorry ;-) – Tim Mar 12 '11 at 18:15

IPv4 address (accurate capture) Matches 0.0.0.0 through 255.255.255.255 Use this regex to match IP numbers with accurracy. Each of the 4 numbers is stored into a capturing group, so you can access them for further processing.

\b
(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.
(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.
(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.
(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)
\b

taken from JGsoft RegexBuddy library

Edit: this (\.|$) part seems wierd

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1  
Nice! I did a more efficient modification of that which seems to work: "\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)(\.|$){4}\b -- thanks! – Matthieu Cartier Mar 12 '11 at 17:36
    const char*ipv4_regexp = "\\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\."
    "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\."
    "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\."
    "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\b";

I adapted the regular expression taken from JGsoft RegexBuddy library to C language (regcomp/regexec) and I found out it works but there's a little problem in some OS like Linux. That regular expression accepts ipv4 address like 192.168.100.009 where 009 in Linux is considered an octal value so the address is not the one you thought. I changed that regular expression as follow:

    const char* ipv4_regex = "\\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9])\\."
           "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9])\\."
           "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9])\\."
           "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9])\\b";

using that regular expressione now 192.168.100.009 is not a valid ipv4 address while 192.168.100.9 is ok.

I modified a regular expression for multicast address too and it is the following:

    const char* mcast_ipv4_regex = "\\b(22[4-9]|23[0-9])\\."
                        "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9])\\."
                        "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9]?)\\."
                        "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9])\\b";

I think you have to adapt the regular expression to the language you're using to develop your application

I put an example in java:

    package utility;

    import java.util.regex.Matcher;
    import java.util.regex.Pattern;

    public class NetworkUtility {

        private static String ipv4RegExp = "\\b(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4]\\d|1\\d\\d|[1-9]?\\d?)\\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4]\\d|1\\d\\d|[1-9]?\\d?)\\b";

        private static String ipv4MulticastRegExp = "2(?:2[4-9]|3\\d)(?:\\.(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4]\\d|1\\d\\d|[1-9]\\d?|0)){3}";

        public NetworkUtility() {

        }

        public static boolean isIpv4Address(String address) {
            Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(ipv4RegExp);
            Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(address);

            return matcher.matches();
        }

        public static boolean isIpv4MulticastAddress(String address) {
             Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(ipv4MulticastRegExp);
             Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(address);

             return matcher.matches();
        }
    }
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I managed to construct a regex from all other answers.

(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[1][0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9]?)(\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[1][0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[0-9]?)){3}
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I was in search of something similar for IPv4 addresses - a regex that also stopped commonly used private ip addresses from being validated (192.168.x.y, 10.x.y.z, 172.16.x.y) so used negative look aheads to accomplish this:

(?!(10\.|172\.(1[6-9]|2\d|3[01])\.|192\.168\.).*)(?!255\.255\.255\.255)(25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d|[1]\d\d|[1-9]\d|[1-9])(\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d|[1]\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){3}

Regular expression visualization

Debuggex Demo

It may not be optimised for speed, but works well when only looking for 'real' internet addresses.

Things that will (and should) fail:

0.1.2.3         (0.0.0.0/8 is reserved for some broadcasts)
10.1.2.3        (10.0.0.0/8 is considered private)
172.16.1.2      (172.16.0.0/12 is considered private)
172.31.1.2      (same as previous, but near the end of that range)
192.168.1.2     (192.168.0.0/16 is considered private)
255.255.255.255 (reserved broadcast is not an IP)
.2.3.4
1.2.3.
1.2.3.256
1.2.256.4
1.256.3.4
256.2.3.4
1.2.3.4.5
1..3.4

IPs that will (and should) work:

1.0.1.0         (China)
8.8.8.8         (Google DNS in USA)
100.1.2.3       (USA)
172.15.1.2      (USA)
172.32.1.2      (USA)
192.167.1.2     (Italy)

Provided in case anybody else is looking for validating 'Internet IP addresses not including the common private addresses'

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mysql> select ip from foo where ip regexp '^\\s*[0-9]+\\.[0-9]+\\.[0-9]+\\.[0-9]\\s*';
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2  
This would match 0987654.3.2.1 too. – memowe Oct 26 '12 at 9:56

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