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I'll admit this is my homework. The task statement said I have to write a program that finds a topological order of a graph which would be inputted by standard input. Then I need to submit it to be graded on the professor's server.

Now it's not the algorithm problem. It's more of a technical problem. In my computer, I use .NET compiler (csc) while the professor's grading machine uses some form of mono.

It works well, until the grader said I got 30/100. A friend of mine suggested that I use the grader's "manual input system", so here I go, I made it create array-of-100000 lists for the adjacency list.

The grader, after a few seconds, reported that my program has crashed.

Stacktrace:

at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0x00004>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0xffffffff>
at System.Exception.ToString () <0x00026>
at (wrapper runtime-invoke) object.runtime_invoke_object__this__ (object,intptr,intptr,intptr) <0xffffffff>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0x00004>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0xffffffff>
at System.Exception.ToString () <0x00026>
at (wrapper runtime-invoke) object.runtime_invoke_object__this__ (object,intptr,intptr,intptr) <0xffffffff>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0x00004>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0xffffffff>
at System.Exception.ToString () <0x00026>
at (wrapper runtime-invoke) object.runtime_invoke_object__this__ (object,intptr,intptr,intptr) <0xffffffff>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0x00004>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0xffffffff>
at System.Exception.ToString () <0x00026>
at (wrapper runtime-invoke) object.runtime_invoke_object__this__ (object,intptr,intptr,intptr) <0xffffffff>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0x00004>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0xffffffff>
at System.Exception.ToString () <0x00026>
at (wrapper runtime-invoke) object.runtime_invoke_object__this__ (object,intptr,intptr,intptr) <0xffffffff>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0x00004>
at (wrapper managed-to-native) object.__icall_wrapper_mono_object_new_fast (intptr) <0xffffffff>
at System.Exception.ToString () <0x00026>
at (wrapper runtime-invoke) object.runtime_invoke

This is kinda strange and unsettling to me, but I have yet to find an answer for this. Again, this program worked really fine on my PC.

This is my part of the program:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class topo{
public static void Main(){
    string[] ST = Console.ReadLine().Split(' ');
    int N=Convert.ToInt32(ST[0]), M=Convert.ToInt32(ST[1]);
    int[] ins = new int[N];  //node's total in-degrees
    List<int>[] E = new List<int>[N];

    for(int n=0;n<N;n++)    
        E[n] = new List<int>();

    for(int m=0;m<M;m++){
        ST = Console.ReadLine().Split(' ');
        int u = Convert.ToInt32(ST[0]);
        int v = Convert.ToInt32(ST[1]);
        E[u-1].Add(v-1);
        ins[v-1]++;
    }

    Queue S = new Queue();
    List<int> L = new List<int>(); //result list

    for(int n=0;n<N;n++){
        //add stranded nodes directly and don't process it
        if(ins[n]==0 && E[n].Count==0)
            L.Add(n);

        //put into queue
        else if(ins[n]==0)
            S.Enqueue(n);
    }

    while(S.Count>0){
        int n = (int) S.Dequeue();
        L.Add(n);
        foreach(int m in E[n])
            if(--ins[m]==0)
                S.Enqueue(m);
    }

    foreach(int n in L)
        Console.WriteLine(n+1);

}

}

Thank you very much, and I appreciate any and every response.

Edit: I took another look at the grader's output to see if I missed anything, and indeed I did. It said "syscal: 2", but all I know about it is that "the program didn't exit normally."

Edit #2: I've tried making the program attempt to make various sizes of the array-of-list, ranging from 5000, 10000, etc. and after 40000 the "manual input system" said the program got a System.OutOfMemoryException. With further look into various parts of the grader that the students are allowed into, it seems that prof misconfigured his grading parameters and gave us less memory than announced. (He said "32MB", but the program crashes at about 16MB)

I've reported the error to him and he is (right now) looking into it.

share|improve this question
3  
The data to be used? You access the array based on the read data. So bad data = crash. You could put some sanity checks when you read the data, to prevent out-of-bound exceptions... –  xanatos Mar 12 '11 at 18:04
1  
@Lunatic do you have the data your teacher used? it could be a funny unix/windows end-of-the-line problem... (under unix the end of the line is different than on windows, and I don't know how the Console.ReadLine() and the pipes handle this) –  xanatos Mar 12 '11 at 18:15
2  
@LunaticNeko: use Int32.TryParse instead of Convert.ToInt32 (to avoid FormatException and OverflowException) and check that ST.Length >= 2. –  Jaroslav Jandek Mar 12 '11 at 18:32
1  
@LunaticNeko As suggested by Jaroslav, but I think ST.Length should be == 2. If different throw an Exception, so you can see it in the output. On an unrelated note, if you use List<T>, you should use Queue<T> instead of Queue. –  xanatos Mar 12 '11 at 18:37
1  
@LunaticNeko To expand what @blizpasta said, I think it's a right to be an inexperienced programmer, it is NOT a right to be a disorderly/untidy inexperienced (or even experienced) programmer. When you program, you should follow coding guidelines on casing, variable names, use of braces... –  xanatos Mar 13 '11 at 9:29

2 Answers 2

The following code is going to fail if the value of u or v is less than 1.

for(int m=0;m<M;m++){
    ST = Console.ReadLine().Split(' ');
    int u = Convert.ToInt32(ST[0]);
    int v = Convert.ToInt32(ST[1]);
    E[u-1].Add(v-1);
    ins[v-1]++;
}

Because u-1 or v-1 is going to be negative, and that will throw an exception.

share|improve this answer

Followup: This is anecdotal, self-answer, and very late because I just realized that it's okay to answer myself. I was later notified that I went over the memory limit enforced by the grading system. However, the exception was quite cryptic in my case and the grader did not report this issue. (It marked me only as incorrect.)

I was also quite careless to not realize that smaller inputs worked, and that's why I got 30/100 and not zero points.

For future readers: When programming in an automatic-grader environment, please make sure your program does not go over the memory limit, which may be there but may not be known to you (i.e. not written in problem statement).

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