Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to C++ and I found this code in a tutorial. I am perplexed to find double stars instead of a single star used for defining a pointer. Is this a substitute for two dimensional array? If yes how?

For example:

int* A = new int[5];

makes an array strip , how does it happen in int **A?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main () {

 int **A;
    A = new int*[10] ;

    for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
       A[j] = new int[20] ;

    for (int i=0; i<10; i++) 
       for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
        A[i][j] = (i+1)*(j+1);


    for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
       for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
        cout << A[i][j] << " ";
       cout << endl;
    }

    cout << endl;

} 
share|improve this question
    
Maybe you will find this interesting : stackoverflow.com/questions/4810664/how-do-i-use-arrays-in-c –  GeorgeAl Mar 12 '11 at 18:22

6 Answers 6

Yes. That is two-dimensional array: more precisely, pointer to pointer!

And you've to deallocate it once you're done with it. This is how you've to delete it:

for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
   delete[] A[j];
delete[] A;

It's good that you're experimenting with it. It would be also good if you also get familiar with std::vector and experiment with it as well.


Example of std::vector

#include <vector>

std::vector<std::vector<int> > A(10, vector<int>(20));

for (int i=0; i<10; i++) 
   for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
    A[i][j] = (i+1)*(j+1);

for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
   for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
    cout << A[i][j] << " ";
   cout << endl;
}

That is, if you use std::vector, then you don't have to worry about allocation and deallocation of memory!

Demo at ideone: http://ideone.com/LEOBe

share|improve this answer
    
hi nawaz, what exactly is std::vector? and how can i utilize it? can u give me a sample code? thanks for replying buddy! –  Frustrated Coder Mar 12 '11 at 18:19
    
@Frustrated Coder: Sure! –  Nawaz Mar 12 '11 at 18:24
    
and by the way if I want to delete it why should j go from 0 to 20? –  Frustrated Coder Mar 12 '11 at 18:25
3  
@Frustrated Coder - I find that mastering the standard libraries to a language is hands down the easiest way to learn a language. You're on the right track! –  corsiKa Mar 12 '11 at 18:27
1  
Just a caution - C++ has something called multi-dimensional arrays, and this isn't one of them. A vector of vectors, and an array of pointers to arrays, can both represent a two-dimensional array, and both allow the [][] syntax, but that isn't C++'s name for them. –  Steve Jessop Mar 12 '11 at 22:03

int **A; means it is a pointer to a pointer. This is often used to represent a two-dimensional array. In you program -

int *A; A = new int[10] ;

for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
   A[j] = new int[20] ; // A[j] means dereferencing to the location itself. So, it should hold `int`
                        // as stated but not `int*` that is returned by new operator.

A is pointer that points 10 memory locations that can hold int. And when you say, A[j] you are actually dereferencing to location. So, it holds an int not an int*. Also, there is a overflow since the number of locations A points to 10 but not 20 memory locations.

Edit 1: OP has edited the program. It's not the same as was earlier.

Now, the program is fine, with exception of returning resources back to free store.

int **A;
A = new int*[10] ;

A is a pointer to pointer. So, a should hold the address of a pointer or an array that can hold address of pointers. So,

A = new int*[10] ;

A holds the beginning address of an array of pointers whose size is 10. Now this is still wrong.

for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
   A[j] = new int[20] ; // Because `A[j]` is invalid from 10-19. There is no such index where A[j] can dereference to. So, j should run from 0 to 10 instead.

With that correctected -

A[j] = new int[20] ;

Now each pointer is pointing to 20 int locations. So, there are 10*20 elements in the array.

This diagram of a 2*3 dimensional array should give you an idea. Also, you should consider @Nawaz answer of deallocating the array, since resources are managed by programmer.

2*3 Array Lay Out

share|improve this answer
    
@Frustrated Coder - Drawing a memory layout for 10*20 is a bit tough task ;) –  Mahesh Mar 12 '11 at 19:38

It's a pointer to a pointer. In this case, it's a 2D array.

share|improve this answer

The two starts mean that it is a pointer to a pointer. This line:

  A = new int*[10];

Allocates space for 10 int* values. Later, each of those int* values are initialized with:

   for (int j=0; j<20; j++) 
       A[j] = new int[20];

The result is a 'jagged array', or an array of arrays. Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer

To create a 2D array, you can either create an array of arrays (this results in a jagged array), or you can create a 1D array and reference it in such a way that it's like a 2D array (this second method is kind of awkward).

// array of arrays
int **A = new int*[5]; // an array of potentially 5 int arrays
for( int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
{
    A[i] = new int[5];
}

// access the array using two brackets
A[0][0] = 1; // element in the zeroth row and zeroth col = 1
A[1][0] = 2; // element in the first row and zeroth col = 2
// you must delete the inside arrays first before deleting the array of arrays
for(int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
{
    delete[] A[i];
}
delete[] A;
share|improve this answer
    
why is it required to do delete[] A[i] before delete[] A...what exactly is deleted when I do delete[] A[i]. Suppose i did delete[] A[1];? –  Frustrated Coder Mar 12 '11 at 18:32
    
@Frustrated Coder - The sample diagram I posted should answer the question. If you do delete[] A[1]; only first row is deallocated and rest stay there. –  Mahesh Mar 12 '11 at 19:42

The first thing you need to know is the difference between a pointer and an array in C and C++. An array type array[size]is size consecutive cells of sizeof(type) data. A pointer is a variable that contains an address. The confusion comes from the fact that a pointer is used to store the address of the first cell of a dynamically allocated array (malloc in C, new [] in C++).

So, what is the difference between int array[10] and int* pi ? array is a memory area of the size of 10 ints and pi is a variable which contains the address of an int.

To declare a two dimensions array you can type : int array2d[10][10] or you can declare a "pointer to pointer" such as int** ppi. Don't forget that id you use the second one, you will have to allocate both the first (an array of pointer) and the second (your actual array of ints) dimensions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.