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Right now many of my designs used sliced graphics with absolute positioned DIVs.

<style>
    #Slice-01 {
        position: absolute;
        left:0; top:0;
        width:214px; height:38px;
    }
</style>

<body>
    <div id="Slice-01">
        <img src="/slices/Slice_01.jpg" width="214" height="38" alt="" border="0" />
    </div>
</body>

I've seen an alternate method where the image is the background of the DIV instead of an object inside the DIV...

<style>
    #Slice-01 {
        position: absolute;
        left:0; top:0;
        width:214px; height:38px;
        background-image: url(/slices/Slice_01.jpg);
        background-repeat: no-repeat;
    }
</style>

<body>
    <div id="Slice-01"></div>
</body>

The only practical difference I can see is that one can drag the image out of the browser window on the first example but cannot when it's the background image.

Questions:

  1. What's the more commonly accepted method and why?
  2. What are the pros and cons of each method?

Thank-you!

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1) To me the second is more semantic and thus would be a better method

2) Pros of Image method:

  • none really

Cons:

  • Congested code and bad maintainability

Pros of CSS:

  • Semantic
  • Easy to maintain

Cons:

  • None
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You don't believe there's anything wrong with an intentionally empty DIV container? This seems counterintuitive to me and why I posted the question. I agree... the second is easier to maintain. Thank-you. –  Sparky Mar 12 '11 at 19:29
    
@Sparky672 not at all - thats what divs were made for was layout purposes, to stop people using tables and other tags, so your solution is completely standard :) –  Myles Gray Mar 12 '11 at 19:31
    
Ok thank-you! It's very clean although it's still hard wrapping my head around intentionally leaving a DIV empty... like maybe some situation where a browser would ignore an empty DIV. –  Sparky Mar 12 '11 at 23:31
    
@Sparky672 Doesn't happen man ;) Div's were made SPECIFICALLY as layout elements :) –  Myles Gray Mar 12 '11 at 23:35
    
Yeah I know, but every day I think I have something all figured out and then some version of Internet Explorer makes a liar out of me. Thanks again. –  Sparky Mar 12 '11 at 23:39
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