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Can somebody please tell me how can i implement division using bit wise operators. A detailed description will be greatly appreciated.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The standard way to do division is by implementing binary long-division. This involves subtraction, so as long as you don't discount this as not a bit-wise operation, then this is what you should do. (Note that you can of course implement subtraction, very tediously, using bitwise logical operations.)

In essence, if you're doing Q = N/D:

  1. Align the most-significant ones of N and D.
  2. Compute t = (N - D);.
  3. If (t >= 0), then set the least significant bit of Q to 1, and set N = t.
  4. Left-shift N by 1.
  5. Left-shift Q by 1.
  6. Go to step 2.

Loop for as many output bits (including fractional) as you require, then apply a final shift to undo what you did in Step 1.

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what do you mean by align the most significant ones of N and D, and do we do this in code. –  TimeToCodeTheRoad Mar 13 '11 at 4:56
    
@Time: For instance if N=9 and D=3, then we have N=1001, D=11. So the first thing to do is to left shift D by 2 so that the leading one matches that of N, i.e. you work with D=1100. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 13 '11 at 10:03
    
@Foli: What happens if t< 0. For N = 1001 and D =11, if I align N and D, then N is 1001 but D is 1100. N-D is negative. But your algorthim does not tell what to do then. Can you give a complete example –  Programmer Mar 14 '11 at 5:52
    
@Programmer: Oh, I'd assumed it was implicit in step 3; if t >= 0, then set the lsb of Q and replace N, otherwise don't do either. If you've ever done long division by hand, this algorithm ought to be familiar (try dividing 1001 by 0011 by hand!). –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 14 '11 at 8:27
    
I think there is a minor issue of this algo, which is that we should do step 5 before step 3. Suppose N=1 and D=1, where we only need to loop once. After step 3, Q=1, and we obviously shouldn't do step 5 after that, otherwise Q becomes 10. –  xvatar Sep 11 '12 at 1:03

Division of two numbers using bitwise operator

 int division(int tempdividend, int tempdivisor) {

     int quotient = 1;

     if (tempdivisor == tempdividend) {
        remainder = 0;
        return 1;
     } else if (tempdividend < tempdivisor) {
        remainder = tempdividend;
        return 0;
     }   

    do{

        tempdivisor = tempdivisor << 1;
        quotient = quotient << 1;

     } while (tempdivisor <= tempdividend);



     /* Call division recursively */
     quotient = quotient + division(tempdividend - tempdivisor, divisor);

     return quotient;
 } 


 void main() {

      printf ("\nEnter the Dividend: ");
      scanf("%d", &dividend);
      printf("\nEnter the Divisor: ");
      scanf("%d", &divisor);   

      printf("\n%d / %d: quotient = %d", dividend, divisor, division(dividend, divisor));
      printf("\n%d / %d: remainder = %d", dividend, divisor, remainder);
      getch();
 }
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2  
where do you pick up divisor from? –  kapad Mar 29 at 14:11
int remainder =0;

int division(int dividend, int divisor) 
{

     int quotient = 1;

    int neg = 1;
    if ((dividend>0 &&divisor<0)||(dividend<0 && divisor>0))
            neg = -1;
    //convert to positive
    unsigned int tempdividend = (dividend < 0) ? -dividend : dividend;
    unsigned int tempdivisor = (divisor < 0) ? -divisor : divisor;

     if (tempdivisor == tempdividend) {
        remainder = 0;
        return 1*neg;
     } else if (tempdividend < tempdivisor) {
              if(dividend < 0)
               remainder = tempdividend*neg;
     else
       remainder = tempdividend;            return 0;
     }   
    while (tempdivisor<<1 <= tempdividend)
    {

        tempdivisor = tempdivisor << 1;
        quotient = quotient << 1;

     } 



     /* Call division recursively */
    if(dividend < 0)
        quotient = quotient*neg + division(-(tempdividend-tempdivisor)  , divisor);
    else
        quotient = quotient*neg + division(tempdividend-tempdivisor  , divisor);
     return quotient;
 } 


 void main() 
{

     int dividend,divisor;
     char ch = 's';
     while(ch != 'x')
     {
      printf ("\nEnter the Dividend: ");
      scanf("%d", &dividend);
      printf("\nEnter the Divisor: ");
      scanf("%d", &divisor);   

      printf("\n%d / %d: quotient = %d", dividend, divisor, division(dividend, divisor));
      printf("\n%d / %d: remainder = %d", dividend, divisor, remainder);

      _getch();
     }
 }
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1  
I tested it. it can handle negative division –  Jack Liu Aug 29 '12 at 8:29

You can find a good explanation of this method, along with pseudocode in C here. The author starts with a detailed breakdown of the steps in regular integer division and then moves on binary division.

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I assume we are discussing division of integers.

Consider that I got two number 1502 and 30, and I wanted to calculate 1502/30. This is how we do this:

First we align 30 with 1501 at its most significant figure, 30 becomes 3000. And compare 1501 with 3000, 1501 contains 0 of 3000. Then we compare 1501 with 300, it contains 5 of 300, then compare (1501-5*300) with 30. At so at last we got 5*(10^1) = 50 as the result of this division.

Now convert both 1501 and 30 into binary digit, then instead of multiplying 30 with (10^x) to align it with 1501, we multiplying (30) in 2 base with 2^n to align. And 2^n can be converted into left shift n positions.

Here is the code:

int divide(int a,int b){
    if (b != 0) return;
    //to check if a or b are negative.
    bool neg = false;
    if ((a>0 && b<0)||(a<0 && b>0))
            neg = true;
    //convert to positive
    unsigned int new_a = (a < 0) ? -a : a;
    unsigned int new_b = (b < 0) ? -b : b;
    //check the largest n such that b >= 2^n, and assign the n to n_pwr
    int n_pwr = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
    {
            if (((1 << i) & new_b) != 0)
                    n_pwr = i;
    }
    //so that a could only contains 2^(31-n_pwr) many b's, 
    //start from here to try the result
    unsigned int res = 0;
    for (int i = 31 - n_pwr; i >= 0; i--){
            if ((new_b << i) <= new_a){
                    res += (1 << i);
                    new_a -= (new_b << i);
            }
    }

    return neg ? -res : res;

}

Didn't test it, but you get the idea.

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This solution works perfectly.

#include<stdio.h>

int division(int dividend, int divisor, int origdiv, int * remainder)
{
    int quotient=1;

    if(dividend == divisor)
     {
         * remainder=0;
         return 1;
     }

    else if (dividend < divisor)
     {
         * remainder=dividend;
         return 0;
     }

    while(divisor <= dividend)
     {
         divisor = divisor << 1;
         quotient = quotient << 1;
     }

     if(dividend < divisor)
      {
          divisor >>=1;
          quotient >>=1;
      }

     quotient = quotient + division(dividend - divisor, origdiv, origdiv,remainder);

    return quotient;
}

int main()
{
    int n=377;
    int d=7;
    int rem=0;

    printf("Quotient  : %d\n",division(n,d,d,&rem));
    printf("Remainder : %d\n",rem);

    return 0;
}
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Below method is the implementation of binary divide considering both numbers are positive. If subtraction is a concern we can implement that as well using binary operators.

======

-(int)binaryDivide:(int)numerator with:(int)denominator
{

    if (numerator ==0 || denominator ==1) {
        return numerator;
    }

    if (denominator ==0) {

#ifdef DEBUG
        NSAssert(denominator==0, @"denominator should be greater then 0");
#endif
        return INFINITY;
    }


//    if (numerator <0) {
//        numerator = abs(numerator);
//    }




    int maxBitDenom = [self getMaxBit:denominator];
    int maxBitNumerator = [self getMaxBit:numerator];
    int msbNumber = [self getMSB:maxBitDenom ofNumber:numerator];

    int qoutient = 0;

    int subResult = 0;

    int remainingBits = maxBitNumerator-maxBitDenom;


    if(msbNumber>=denominator){
        qoutient |=1;
        subResult = msbNumber- denominator;
    }
    else{
        subResult = msbNumber;
    }


    while(remainingBits>0){
        int msbBit = (numerator & (1<<(remainingBits-1)))>0?1:0;
        subResult = (subResult <<1) |msbBit;
        if(subResult >= denominator){
            subResult = subResult-denominator;
            qoutient= (qoutient<<1)|1;
        }
        else{
            qoutient = qoutient<<1;
        }
        remainingBits--;

    }
    return qoutient;
}

-(int)getMaxBit:(int)inputNumber
{
    int maxBit =0;
    BOOL isMaxBitSet = NO;
    for(int i=0;i<sizeof(inputNumber)*8;i++){
        if( inputNumber & (1<<i) ){
            maxBit = i;
            isMaxBitSet=YES;
        }
    }
    if (isMaxBitSet) {
        maxBit+=1;
    }
    return maxBit;
}



-(int)getMSB:(int)bits ofNumber:(int)number
{
    int numbeMaxBit = [self getMaxBit:number];
    return number>>(numbeMaxBit -bits);
}
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public static int divide(int a, int b){
    boolean n = false;
    if(b==0) return -1;
    if(b==1) return a;

    if(a<0){ n = true; a = -a;}
    if(b<0){ n = true; b = -b;} 
    if(a<0 && b<0) n = false;

    while(b!=1){
        a = (a>>1);
        b = (b>>1);
    }

    if (n) return -a;
    else return a;
}
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The Algorithm returns wrong value for divide(7,3). –  Vinisha Vyasa May 2 at 19:55

For integers:

public class Division {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("Division: " + divide(100, 9));
}

public static int divide(int num, int divisor) {
    int sign = 1;
    if((num > 0 && divisor < 0) || (num < 0 && divisor > 0))
        sign = -1;

    return divide(Math.abs(num), Math.abs(divisor), Math.abs(divisor)) * sign;
}

public static int divide(int num, int divisor, int sum) {
    if (sum > num) {
        return 0;
    }

    return 1 + divide(num, divisor, sum + divisor);
}

}

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Since bit wise operations work on bits that are either 0 or 1, each bit represents a power of 2, so if I have the bits

1010

that value is 10.

Each bit is a power of two, so if we shift the bits to the right, we divide by 2

1010 --> 0101

0101 is 5

so, in general if you want to divide by some power of 2, you need to shift right by the exponent you raise two to, to get that value

so for instance, to divide by 16, you would shift by 4, as 2^^4 = 16.

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I don't think the OP is only interested in dividing by powers of 2. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 12 '11 at 19:38
    
Oli is right! I want to divide by numbers that are not powers of 2 –  TimeToCodeTheRoad Mar 13 '11 at 4:56

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