Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So what I am trying to is find all the prime factors of a number n. When I give it 126 it gives me 2, 3, and 7 but when I give it say 8 it gives me 2, 4, 8. Any ideas?

int findPrime(unsigned long n)
{
  int testDivisor, i;
  i = 0;
  testDivisor = 2;
  while (testDivisor < n + 1)
  {
    if ((testDivisor * testDivisor) > n)
    {
    //If the test divisor squared is greater than the current n, then 
    //the current n is either 1 or prime. Save it if prime and return
    }
    if (((n % testDivisor) == 0))
    {
      prime[i] = testDivisor;
      if (DEBUG == 1) printf("prime[%d] = %d\n", i, prime[i]);
      i++;
      n = n / testDivisor;
    }
    testDivisor++;
  }
  return i;
}
share|improve this question
    
Why do you have an if statement with an empty block? –  Jim Balter Mar 12 '11 at 23:40
    
my teacher gave that as part of his suggested algorithm –  foo Mar 13 '11 at 4:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are incrementing testDivisor even when you were able to divide n by it. Only increase it when it is not divisible anymore. This will result in 2,2,2, so you have to modify it a bit further so you do not store duplicates, but since this is a homework assignment I think you should figure that one out yourself :)

share|improve this answer
    
ie You have to <OBFUSCATED SINCE IT'S HOMEWORK> –  quasiverse Mar 12 '11 at 20:43
    
@Yuri Happy now? :D –  quasiverse Mar 12 '11 at 20:47
    
@quasiverse: Yes! deleted mine as well ^^ –  Yuri Mar 12 '11 at 20:53
    
Any hints on how not to store duplicates? –  foo Mar 12 '11 at 21:18
    
No. This should be fairly simple, and you should really be able to figure this one out for yourself as a homework assignment, judging by the assignment, and my experience as a teacher that is definitely not too much to ask. –  Yuri Mar 12 '11 at 21:26

Is this based on an algorithm your professor told you to implement or is it your own heuristic? In case it helps, some known algorithms for prime factorization are the Quadratic Sieve and the General Number Field Sieve.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is called Direct Search Factorization and is by far the easiest to implement. See: link –  Yuri Mar 12 '11 at 20:56

Right now, you aren't checking if any divisors you find are prime. As long as n % testDivisor == 0 you are counting testDivisor as a prime factor. Also, you are only dividing through by testDivisor once. You could fix this a number of ways, one of which would be to replace the statement if (((n % testDivisor) == 0)) with while (((n % testDivisor) == 0)).

Fixing this by adding the while loop also ensures that you won't get composite numbers as divisors, as if they still divide n, a smaller prime factor must have also divided n and the while loop for that prime factor wouldn't have left early.

share|improve this answer
    
edit You've edited your post, now this comment is obsolete :) -- Sorry, you are wrong. This IS actually happening, although a bit obfuscated. If you keep dividing by a number (starting from 2) until it is not divisible anymore, you can safely increase the divisor. It cannot be divided any further by any multiple 2. After the next round it cannot be divided by any multiple of 3, etc... This way you will only find divisors which are in itself not divisible, thus prime. –  Yuri Mar 12 '11 at 20:50

Here is code to find the Prime Factor:

long GetPrimeFactors(long num, long *arrResult)
{
    long count = 0;
    long arr[MAX_SIZE];

    long i = 0;

    long idx = 0;

    for(i = 2; i <= num; i++)
    {
      if(IsPrimeNumber(i) == true)
          arr[count++] = i;
    }

    while(1)
    {
      if(IsPrimeNumber(num) == true)
      {
          arrResult[idx++] = num;
          break;
      }
      for(i = count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
      {
          if( (num % arr[i]) == 0)
          {
            arrResult[idx++] = arr[i];
            num = num / arr[i];
            break;
          }
      }
    }
    return idx;
}

Reference: http://www.softwareandfinance.com/Turbo_C/Prime_Factor.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.