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I have some code that often looks like this:

private $user;

public function __construct()
{
    $this->user = User::getInstance(); //singleton
}

public function methodOne()
{
    return $this->user->foo();
}

public function methodTwo()
{
    return $this->user->foo2();
}

public function methodThree()
{
    return $this->user->foo3();
}

I figure if I set user property to the instance I can reuse a shorter name in my methods (well in this case it's not that much shorter). I also thought doing it this way might save a little resources (beginning to doubt it), but when I look at other people's code I rarely see people do this. They would usually just call:

User::getInstance()->foo();
User::getInstance()->foo2();
User::getInstance()->foo3();

Is there any sort of best practice for this? Maybe if it's not a singleton class you might do it this way? Or maybe you should never do it this way? Hope to get some clarification, thanks.

Edit: Incase there is any misunderstanding I'm just wondering if I should the first example with creating a property to store the instance vs this:

public function methodOne()
{
    return User::getInstance()->foo();
}

public function methodTwo()
{
    return User::getInstance()->foo2();
}

public function methodThree()
{
    return User::getInstance()->foo3();
}

Actually now that I think about it this may be less code as I don't need the constructor...

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are indeed some problems with your approach.

  • It is not clear that your class depends on the User class. You can solve this with adding User as a constructor parameter.
  • Singletons are often bad practice. Your code demonstrates why: it is globally accessible and hence difficult to track dependencies using it (this points to the above problem).
  • Static methods are too often used as global access points (in response to what you see people usually do User::method()). Global access points give the same problem as singletons. They are also a tad more difficult to test.

I also don't see the point in repeating the User object with your new object, unless you would use eg the adapter pattern. Maybe if you could clarify this I would be able to come up with a better alternative than the generic:

class Foo {
    public function __construct(User $user) {
        $this->user = $user;
    }
    public function doXsimplified() {
        $this->user->doXbutMoreComplex($arg1,$arg2, $arg20);
    }
}
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+1 for good explanation –  Alex Bailey Mar 13 '11 at 0:35
    
Edited my post, I also create the wrapper as it is integrating with another app so I don't have to rename all my methods if I later change apps. I'm also not sure if I'm able to use the method you showed as I wouldn't have the user object yet? –  Joker Mar 13 '11 at 1:16
    
@Joker That's a good use of the wrapper. Your user object comes into play the moment the wrapper object appears (since it is there to manipulate the third party user object). So if you create the user object the moment before or after the other one is created won't make a difference. –  koen Mar 13 '11 at 14:30
    
Yea, there is no difference, I think I still didn't describe myself well enough. It's actually much more simple. I wanted to know whether I should store the instance in a property set by the constructor or just get the instance directly (as seen in the 2 examples above). I think this is just a preference? I'm now leaning towards the second way as it seems to make things more clear. –  Joker Mar 13 '11 at 16:36
    
@Joker I would follow the rule 'isolate change'. Where's a change most likely to occur and what will save you the most work (no matter how small a difference) if something changed? However, if you find the second example much clearer that's an argument in favor of that. –  koen Mar 13 '11 at 17:06
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My personal preference in PHP is to use classes with just static methods for singletons, so you have

User::foo();
User::bar();
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+1, Short and sweet. –  Brad Christie Mar 12 '11 at 23:37
    
Could be implemented most simply with __callStatic –  mario Mar 12 '11 at 23:47
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I would not create a new class just to wrap around a singleton like that. But if your new class adds some extra logic then your example makes sense. Remember, if you're worried that you're too verbose you can always use a temporary variable for successive function calls.

$user = User::getInstance();
$user->foo();
$user->bar();

But personally, I don't use Singletons anymore. Instead, I use Dependency Injection. I like the sfServiceContainer, but there are others. Have a look at this series of articles: http://fabien.potencier.org/article/11/what-is-dependency-injection

UPDATE

Based on the additional comments, this is how I would do it:

class UserWrapper
{
    private $user = null;

    public function __construct($user)
    {
        $this->user = $user;
    }

    public function foo()
    {
         return $this->user->foo();
    }

    ...
}

Then use it like this:

$user = new UserWrapper(User::getInstance());

Why? So I can pass in a fake User object if I want to test the UserWrapper class. E.g:

class UserMock { ... } // A fake object that looks like a User
$userTest = new UserWrapper(new UserMock());
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1  
+1 for mentioning dependency injection. –  koen Mar 13 '11 at 0:05
    
Yea there will also be some extra logic as well. This is kind of integrating with another app so I wrap the User class methods and later decide I change apps I don't have to rename everything. For the code you showed yea I do that, but just wondering what is best approach to use if you only use the instance once within each method. Edited my main post. –  Joker Mar 13 '11 at 1:12
    
If you add extra logic then you code is fine. The only thing I would change is not getting the instance of User in the constructor but pass it as an argument to the constructor instead (to facilitate dependency injection). –  Sander Marechal Mar 13 '11 at 10:38
    
Sorry maybe I'm still not explaining myself too well, I just wanted to know if it's better to store the instance of the variable vs. calling the instance directly as seen in the two examples above. I'm leaning towards the 2nd way (callling it directly each time) as it seems to be more clear. –  Joker Mar 13 '11 at 16:38
    
I'd use the first way. I have updated my answer with an example. –  Sander Marechal Mar 14 '11 at 6:36
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I usually go like this, if you have already included the class in a bootstrap of some sort or a config file. I would usually declear the $user variable in a bootstrap that will get called on every page load, then just reference it as a global variable on other php files, this is what I would have in the bootstrap file.

$user = new User();

Then this is what I would have in the calling php file

global $user;
$user->foo();
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I believe using globals is not one of the "good oop practices" in php –  Alex Bailey Mar 13 '11 at 0:34
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