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I have these two tables:

CREATE TABLE `cpuinfo` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `usagetime` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  `cpuusage` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `id_UNIQUE` (`id`),
  KEY `idx_usagetime` (`usagetime`),
  KEY `idx_usage` (`cpuusage`));

CREATE TABLE `jobinfo` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `starttime` datetime NOT NULL,
  `endtime` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  `jobname` text NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `id_UNIQUE` (`id`),
  KEY `idx-startime` (`starttime`),
  KEY `idx-endtime` (`endtime`));

Using this query:

explain SELECT j.id, j.starttime, j.endtime, j.jobname, c.cpuusage
   FROM (SELECT j.id, j.starttime, j.endtime, j.jobname, MAX(c.usagetime) AS usagetime
           FROM jobinfo AS j
      LEFT JOIN cpuinfo AS c ON c.usagetime <= j.starttime
       GROUP BY j.id) AS j
   JOIN cpuinfo AS c ON j.usagetime = c.usagetime
ORDER BY j.starttime

It takes about 10 minutes to run.

for explain command, I got this output

id,select_type,table,type,possible_keys,key,key_len,ref,rows,Extra
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
1,PRIMARY,<derived2>,ALL,NULL,NULL,NULL,NULL,4557,"Using filesort"
1,PRIMARY,c,ref,idx_usagetime,idx_usagetime,9,j.usagetime,1,"Using where"
2,DERIVED,j,ALL,NULL,NULL,NULL,NULL,4557,"Using temporary; Using filesort"
2,DERIVED,c,index,idx_usagetime,idx_usagetime,9,NULL,2880,"Using index"

Can you give me some tips to optimize this SQL query?

Here is my orginal post:

Mysql join with time matching

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try:

SELECT ji.starttime, 
       ji.endtime,
       ji.jobname,
       (SELECT ci.cpuusage
          FROM CPUINFO ci
         WHERE ci.usagetime <= ji.endtime
      ORDER BY ci.usagetime DESC
         LIMIT 1) AS cpuusage
  FROM JOBINFO ji

Here's the EXPLAIN output on my 5.1.49:

id   select_type           table type   possible_keys    key   key_len ref   rows Extra
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
'1', 'PRIMARY',            'ji', 'ALL', NULL,            NULL, NULL,   NULL, '12', ''
'2', 'DEPENDENT SUBQUERY', 'ci', 'ALL', 'idx_usagetime', NULL, NULL,   NULL, '6', 'Using where; Using filesort'
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You are joining on a less than comparison:

c.usagetime <= j.starttime

That means every cpu record that has a usagetime less than the job start time will be joined to the job record. This query is going to get slower and slower over time since it will join information from months ago if it is present. You're only interested in the latest entry before the job start time.

If you are assured that there is a cpuinfo record within a certain span of time of the job start time, change that to a range search.

c.usagetime between j.starttime and date_sub(j.starttime, interval 5 minute)

That should speed it up considerably. The smaller you can make the interval the better.

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You could try this little trick:

SELECT j.id, j.starttime, j.endtime, j.jobname, c.cpuusage
FROM
(
    SELECT j.id, j.starttime, j.endtime, j.jobname, MAX(c.usagetime) AS usagetime
    FROM jobinfo AS j
    LEFT JOIN cpuinfo AS c
    ON c.usagetime <= j.starttime
    WHERE c.usagetime > DATE_ADD(j.starttime, INTERVAL -1 DAY);
    GROUP BY j.id
) AS j
JOIN cpuinfo AS c
ON j.usagetime = c.usagetime
ORDER BY j.starttime;

This should cause the server to take just a part of o cpuinfo table, nor the whole, or half of it.

PS: try to consider the interval value, maybe 5 minutes in Your case would be enough.

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