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I am trying to extract specific index values from an array, and place them into a new array. The primary array values are as follows:

 int a[] = {7, 8, 9, 9, 8, 7};

The call I am making to the method is as follows:

print(findAll (a,7));
print(findAll (a,2));

The method I am using is as follows:

public int[] findAll(int a[], int target)
    {
       int count = 0;
       int i = 0; 
       int index = 0;
       int spotIndex = 0;


       for (i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
        {
          if (a[i] == target)
            count = count + 1;
            spotIndex = i;
        }        

        int result[] = new int[count];

        for (index = 0; index < count; index++) 
        {
            result[index] = spotIndex;
            index++;

        }
        return result;
    } 

The results should be:

{0, 5} {}

My results are below; if I change the target argument I get the same results.

{5, 0} {}

Thanks in advance....

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

spotIndex isn't serving the purpose you thought needed for.

for (i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
{
      if (a[i] == target)
        count = count + 1;
        spotIndex = i;     // spotIndex comes in for loop but not in if condition.
                           // and this gets modified at every step in loop.
                           // simply assigning value of i to it.
}

Instead the logic should be -

for (i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
{
      if (a[i] == target)
        count = count + 1;
} 

count gives the number of times target is repeated. Now, create an array of size count to actually copy those element's index in to the array.

int result[] = new int[count];
int copyIndex = 0;
for (index = 0; index < a.length; index++) 
{
     if( a[index] == target )
     {
          result[copyIndex] = index ;
          ++copyIndex;  

          if( copyIndex == count )
              return result ;              
     }  
}

I don't see the use of this statement - spotIndex = i; in first loop.

Note: The logic assumes that search element( i.e., target ) is definitely present in the array. With slight modification though, we can return the indexes if element is present only.

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Awesome, and thanks so much for the explanation! Tom –  user592646 Mar 13 '11 at 3:37

Small advice:

for (index = 0; index < count; index++) 
{
    result[index] = spotIndex;
    index++;
}

you index++ call double times. This is bad practice to use index in method scope, better is:

for (int index = 0; index < count; index++) 
{
    result[index] = spotIndex;
}

Notice that you put spotIndex (the same value) in all result elements.

Why you don't use List?

public Integer[] findAll(int a[], int target) {
    List<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
        if (a[i] == target) {
            result.add(i);
        }
    }       
    return result.toArray(new Integer[result.size()]);
}
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