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In the below code, cout is outputting the correct string arrays. Unfortunately, in other places in the code (still in the same function and thus not a scope error) cout << rs[i] where 0<i<5 and i is an int, outputs a blank space. Help would be appreciated.

int N;
inp >> N;
string a[N]; //For matchee
string b[N]; //For matcher
string rs[N]; //For reflection
for(int i=0; i<N; i++) {
    inp >> a[i];
}
for(int i=0; i<N; i++) {
    inp >> b[i];
}
/*Build the reflection matrix*/
bool reflectCorrect = 1;
for(int i=0; i<N; i++) {
    for(int j=0; j<N; j++) {
        rs[i][j] = a[i][N-1-j];
        cout << rs[i][j];
        if(!(rs[i][j] == b[i][j])) {
            reflectCorrect=0;
        }
    }
    cout << "\n";
}
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How do you think that showing us a code that is correct will let us guess what's wrong in a code you don't show us? –  littleadv Mar 13 '11 at 2:36
1  
What devilish compiler even compiles this? You're not supposed to make variable-sized arrays in C++. –  ltjax Mar 13 '11 at 2:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The line rs[i][j] = a[i][N-1-j]; is incorrect. It is potentially writing out of bounds of the allocated string. Things seem ok when you print it right after writing there, but later on, other code will have used the space for other things. Because you're writing single characters in order to the string, you can use push_back instead.

rs[i].push_back(a[i][N-1-j]);

This should allocate more space for the string as you need it.

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Thank you so much! That worked! –  joshim5 Mar 13 '11 at 2:52

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