Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

More details below:

1st line

2nd line

3rd line

4th line

...

Now want to insert a new line named zero line before 1st line. File looks like below:

zero line

1st line

2nd line

3rd line

4th line

...

I know sed command can do this work, but how to do it using python? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
You may want to check the question I've asked a year ago. It's answered by Alex Martelli and S.Lott, both are great Python gurus -- stackoverflow.com/questions/1325905/… –  Wang Dingwei Mar 13 '11 at 7:08
    
@Wang Dingwei Yeah, thank you Dingwei!~ –  Jason Mar 13 '11 at 7:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you can use fileinput

>>> import fileinput
>>> for linenum,line in enumerate( fileinput.FileInput("file",inplace=1) ):
...   if linenum==0 :
...     print "new line"
...     print line.rstrip()
...   else:
...     print line.rstrip()
...
share|improve this answer
    
you can use fileinputs' .isfirstline() instead of using linenum == 0 –  DTing Mar 13 '11 at 6:56
    
and @kriegar thanks for your tips. –  Jason Mar 13 '11 at 7:24
    
This won't work for empty files. You could use print line, (note: comma) instead of print line.rstrip() the latter might remove too much whitespace. Why don't you use fileinput.input(inplace=1)? –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 13 '11 at 15:05
    
I've added an implementation that leaves original data intact (except prepending a line) stackoverflow.com/questions/5287762/… –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 14 '11 at 7:10

this might be of interest

http://net4geeks.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=53&Itemid=11

adapted to your question:

# read the current contents of the file
f = open('filename')
text = f.read()
f.close()
# open the file again for writing
f = open('filename', 'w')
f.write("zero line\n\n")
# write the original contents
f.write(text)
f.close()
  • Open the file and read the contents into 'text'.

  • Close the file

  • Reopen the file with argument 'w' to write

  • Write text to prepend to the file

  • Write the original contents of the file to the file

  • Close file

Read the warnings in the link.

edit:

But note that this isn't entirely safe, if your Python session crashes after opening the file the second time and before closing it again, you will lose data.

share|improve this answer
    
You could inline warnings from net4geeks in your answer. The fact that the code might lose data is important enough and it is resilient to a linkrot. See my answer for a version that doesn't require to load the whole file in memory stackoverflow.com/questions/5287762/… –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 14 '11 at 7:08

Here's an implementation that fixes some deficiencies in other approaches presented sofar:

It mimics fileinput's error handling:

import os

def prepend(filename, data, bufsize=1<<15):
    # backup the file
    backupname = filename + os.extsep+'bak'
    try: os.unlink(backupname) # remove previous backup if it exists
    except OSError: pass
    os.rename(filename, backupname)

    # open input/output files,  note: outputfile's permissions lost
    with open(backupname) as inputfile, open(filename, 'w') as outputfile:
        # prepend
        outputfile.write(data)
        # copy the rest
        buf = inputfile.read(bufsize)
        while buf:
            outputfile.write(buf)
            buf = inputfile.read(bufsize)

    # remove backup on success
    try: os.unlink(backupname)
    except OSError: pass

prepend('file', '0 line\n')

You could use cat utility if it is available to copy the files. It might be more efficient:

import os
from subprocess import PIPE, Popen

def prepend_cat(filename, data, bufsize=1<<15):
    # backup the file
    backupname = filename + os.extsep+'bak'
    try: os.unlink(backupname)
    except OSError: pass
    os.rename(filename, backupname)

    # $ echo $data | cat - $backupname > $filename
    with open(filename, 'w') as outputfile: #note: outputfile's permissions lost
        p = Popen(['cat', '-', backupname], stdin=PIPE, stdout=outputfile)
        p.communicate(data)

    # remove backup on success
    if p.poll() == 0:
        try: os.unlink(backupname)
        except OSError: pass

prepend_cat('file', '0 line\n')
share|improve this answer

code

L = list()
f = open('text2.txt', 'r')
for line in f.readlines():
        L.append(line)
L.insert(0,"Zero\n")
f.close()

fi = open('text2.txt', 'w')
for line in xrange(len(L)):
        fi.write(L[line])

fi.close()

text2.txt

Hello
The second line
3
4
5
6

output

Zero
Hello
The second line
3
4
5
6

This can be memory heavy and time consuming for large files however.

If you are worried about something like 31st line, I would just do a mod%10 on the num, to get a more accurate version.

Let me know if this helps, or if you want a better version. Also, if you want a better formatting, look into ljust and rjust for left and right justify.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure the original question is asking how to prepend lines before the start of the file. Your answer is just numbering the lines of a file which doesn't look like what hes asking for. Also you can use a list comprehension to generate that list. [ line for line in f.readlines() ] if you really want to generate a list of lines in f. –  DTing Mar 13 '11 at 6:30
    
yeah, re read that, and added the writing section. –  Jim Mar 13 '11 at 6:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.