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I am using realloc to allocated memory at runtime in dynamic array. Firstly, I allocated a memory with calloc with sizeof a random integer a. In my program, I have taken a=2. After that I want to store some 14 random values generated, so I have to resize the memory using realloc. I am doing the same in a for loop. FOr 1 iteration, realloc works but after that size doesnt increase and a error occurs "corruption in heap". I am not able to understand the problem. Pls help me if you can, in understanding where the problem is occuring and how to solve it. Thanks a lot. Below is my code:

j=j*a; //a=3
    numbers = (int*) calloc(b, j); //b=14, no of elements I want to store

    printf("Address:%p\n",numbers);
    if (numbers == NULL)
    {
        printf("No Memory Allocated\n");
    }
    else
    {
    printf("Initial array size: %d elements\n", a);
    printf("Adding %d elements\n", b);
    }



    srand( (unsigned) time( NULL ) );
    for(count = 1; count <= b ; count++)
    {


        if(i <= j)
        {

        numbers[count] = rand() % 100 + 1;
        printf( "Adding Value:%3d Address%p\n", numbers[count],numbers[count] );

           i++;

        }

        if (i > j)
        {
                printf("Increasing array size from %d bytes to %d bytes\n",j,j*a);
                j=j*a;  
                numbers = (int*) realloc(numbers,j);
                printf("Address:%p\n",numbers);
                if(numbers == NULL)
            {
                printf("No Memory allocated\n");
            }


        }

    }   

    free(numbers);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
numbers array index should starts from 0 to b-1. This is one possible mistake( in your snippet, it is from 1 to b ), if i<=j is always true in the for loop. –  Mahesh Mar 13 '11 at 7:52
1  
Please don't cast the pointer returned from realloc( ). There's no reason to call calloc( ) at the top; instead, set numbers = NULL before the first call to realloc( ). And, above all, save the contents of numbers before each call to realloc( ). Why? Suppose realloc( ) returns NULL; how can you ever free( ) the memory that was previously allocated? –  Pete Wilson Mar 13 '11 at 8:10
    
You initialise j to 1. You mulptiply it by 3. Now j=3. You then allocate an array with b=14 elements, each element of size=3. What are you trying to do? –  David Heffernan Mar 13 '11 at 8:12

2 Answers 2

  • The initial array length (length and size are not the same) is b, not a.
  • Adding b elements? I don't think you are.
  • Arrays are zero-based in C. You loop should be for(count=0; count<b ; count++).
  • count is a terrible name for a loop variable. count should hold the number of elements and not be a loop variable.
  • It's hard to imagine what j could be. Since you use it as the element size in your call to calloc it ought be at least be a multiple of 4, the size of in int. What is it?!
  • The realloc doesn't seem to bear any relation to the calloc.

I'm sure there are lots of other problems. If you want more help then a clear statement of what your goal is would be required.

EDIT

It sounds like you want something like this:

int capacity = 10;
int count = 40;
int i;

int* array = (int*)malloc(capacity*sizeof(int));
for (i=0; i<count; i++)
{
    if (i==capacity)
    {
        capacity *= 2;
        array = (int*)realloc(array, capacity*sizeof(int));
    }
    array[i] = RandomIntInRange(1, 100);
}
free(array);

Notes:

  1. No error checking. In production code you would check that the allocations succeeded, and the realloc done this way would leak if it failed. But there's no point confusing the message with error checking when you are still at this level of understanding.
  2. No reading input - you can do that.
  3. No writing output - you can do that.
share|improve this answer
    
Original question is :Write a program that accepts two int values from the command line Take the first parameter value and create a dynamic array of ints sized to this value. Output to the Console “Initial array size: Take the second parameter value and add this number of elements to the array between 1 and 100). Output to the Console “Adding: n elements” and then “Adding value: a” for each addition. If the second value exceeds the first value, you will have to resize the array to accomodate extra elements. Double the size of the array each tim you are about to exceed its capacity. –  user641781 Mar 13 '11 at 8:13
    
Thanks David. For your help. Its working now. In my code, I didn't multiply the integer with sizeof(int). That was a bad mistake. –  user641781 Mar 13 '11 at 8:28
    
@user as well as getting it work, please take some time to see how I have chosen and used variable names. Look at how the loop runs etc. –  David Heffernan Mar 13 '11 at 8:30
    
@user also, it is considered polite to accept the answers that best help you. See the FAQ. –  David Heffernan Mar 13 '11 at 8:59

The integer "j" is not initialized in your code, resulting in a = 0 * 3, meaning a will be zero and no memory will be allocated. The segfault is due to you not handling that numbers is NULL. Change to and set j to something meaningful

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void
main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int a = 3;
  int j = 1 * a;        //a=3
  int b = 14;
  int *numbers = calloc (b, j); //b=14, no of elements I want to store
  int count = 0, i = 0;

  printf ("Address:%p\n", numbers);
  if (numbers == NULL)
    {
      printf ("No Memory Allocated\n");
      return;
    }
  else
    {
      printf ("Initial array size: %d elements\n", a);
      printf ("Adding %d elements\n", b);
    }



  srand ((unsigned) time (NULL));
  for (count = 1; count <= b; count++)
    {
      if (i <= j)
    {
      numbers[count] = rand () % 100 + 1;
      printf ("Adding Value:%3d Address%p\n", numbers[count],
          &(numbers[count]));

      i++;

    }

      if (i > j)
    {
      printf ("Increasing array size from %d bytes to %d bytes\n", j,
          j * a);
      j = j * a;
      numbers = (int *) realloc (numbers, j);
      printf ("Address:%p\n", numbers);
      if (numbers == NULL)
        {
          printf ("No Memory allocated\n");
        }


    }

    }

  free (numbers);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have initialized j =1, but even then it doesnt work. –  user641781 Mar 13 '11 at 8:03
    
Who up-voted this? I honestly don't understand the voting patterns here sometimes. –  David Heffernan Mar 13 '11 at 8:49

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