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var query = from emp in dbEmp.Employees
            join dept in dbEmp.Departments on emp.DeptID equals dept.DeptID
            where dept.DepartmentName.Contains(this.TextBox1.Text)
            select new
            {
                EmpID = emp.EmpID,
                EmpName = emp.EmpName,
                Age = emp.Age,
                Address = emp.Address,
                DeptName = dept.DepartmentName
            };

if (query == null)
    Label1.Text = "no results match your search";

GridView1.DataSource = query;
GridView1.DataBind();

Everything works in the right way, but the label doesn't show the message when query result returns null. The label can show without condition (query==null). So how to test if a var query result returns nothing? Thanks

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2  
LINQ query expressions cannot actually return null, only empty sets. –  BoltClock Mar 13 '11 at 8:08
    
@BoltClock, what if you put a .FirstOrDefault() on the end? Does that not count? –  jb. Mar 13 '11 at 8:15
1  
@jb: Once you put something like FirstOrDefault on the end, you have "left the monad" and are no longer dealing with a LINQ query expression. A query expression has a type like IEnumerable<T> or IQueryable<T> while FirstOrDefault has a type like T. –  Gabe Mar 13 '11 at 8:31

5 Answers 5

If I could teach people just one thing about LINQ it is this:

The value of a query expression is the query not the results of the query.

When you say

var q = from c in customers where c.City == "London" select c.Name;

q does not contain a sequence of customer names from London. q contains a query representing the operation query the customers database as follows.... The query does not run; all you've done is created the query. When you enumerate the query, that's when the query fetches the results.

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if (!query.Any())
{
 // no results
}
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The condition you're looking for is

if (query.Count() == 0)

Since the actual query variable will always contain the valid (non-null) query object itself, not the query results.

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1  
Count() enumerates whole query. FirstOrDefault() enumerates only the first element. –  mgronber Mar 13 '11 at 8:15
7  
Any() is better than either of them, as it doesn't give a false-empty when the sequence contains a null element, it doesn't enumerate the whole sequence, and it says exactly what you're trying to do: see if there are any elements. –  Jon Skeet Mar 13 '11 at 8:34
    
@Jon: I would expect .Count() to send a SELECT COUNT(...) query, not enumerate the whole sequence. It's bad, but not as bad. –  Gabe Mar 13 '11 at 8:42
    
@Gabe: For LINQ to SQL or something similar, I agree. For LINQ to Objects, it will enumerate everything (if it's not an ICollection). There's still the readability benefit, IMO. –  Jon Skeet Mar 13 '11 at 8:44
    
I actually agree with Jon here, because the underlying query provider should not (in theory) impact the way we write the LINQ query. –  Aviad P. Mar 13 '11 at 9:30

The query is never null. The result of the query may be an empty set. You can either check if the query contains at least one item or you can force it to execute completely.

if (!query.Any()) {
    // no results
}

GridView1.DataSource = query;
GridView1.DataBind();

or

var results = query.ToList();
if (!results.Any()) {
    // no results
}

// Here you should use results instead of query because
// there is no need to re-evaluate the query again.

GridView1.DataSource = results;
GridView1.DataBind();

In this case the latter solution is most likely better.

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2  
Your second option is fine, but your first is a problem: What if the first result was just null? –  Gabe Mar 13 '11 at 8:27
    
I don't see the problem. The query cannot be null and query.FirstOrDefault() is expected to be either null or a instance. –  mgronber Mar 13 '11 at 8:34
2  
@Gabe: Your point is a good one in general (although I would prefer to see Any() instead of Count()==0) but when the query uses new { ... } as in this case, we know that there will never be any null elements. That can change whether or not FirstOrDefault is appropriate. –  Jon Skeet Mar 13 '11 at 8:35
1  
It would work for this particular query, but not all queries. Your answer implies that query.FirstOrDefault() will always tell you if a query returns at least one result, which is incorrect. –  Gabe Mar 13 '11 at 8:37
    
Ok, now I understand what Gabe meant. That is a good point. –  mgronber Mar 13 '11 at 8:38

You want to avoid evaluating the query twice, so first you should save its results. Then check it for emptiness and either databind or show an error:

var results = query.ToList();
if (!results.Any())
    Label1.Text = "no results match your search";

GridView1.DataSource = results;
GridView1.DataBind();
share|improve this answer
    
What for ToList()? –  abatishchev Mar 13 '11 at 15:46
    
@abatishchev: ToList saves the results of the query to avoid evaluating the query twice (ToArray would work just as well). The DataBind call is going to fully evaluate the query anyway, so we may as well save the results of it to use with the Any call. Does this make sense now? –  Gabe Mar 13 '11 at 16:32

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