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This code results in a compile-time error:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <cmath>

template <unsigned short n>
class Vector {
    public:
        std::vector<float> coords;

        Vector();
        Vector(std::vector<float> crds);


        float distanceFrom(Vector<n> v);

        template <unsigned short m>
        friend std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& out, const Vector<m>& v);
};



    template <unsigned short n>
Vector<n>(vector<float> crds) {  // HERE IS ERRRO

}

Compile error:

C:\CodeBlocks\kool\praks3\vector.h|29|error: expected ')' before '<' token|
||=== Build finished: 1 errors, 0 warnings ===|
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2  
Maybe you should do less writing code and more reading until you master the basics? –  Jon Mar 13 '11 at 10:15
    
The best way of "mastering the basics" is not only reading but also trying to use it in some simple examples. Once you get over these mistakes, you will remember the constructs much better and (almost) never make the same mistakes twice. –  CygnusX1 Mar 13 '11 at 10:20
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here is how you should define the constructor outside the class:

template <unsigned short n>
Vector<n>::Vector(std::vector<float> crds) {
//also notice this ^^^^                 
}
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1  
aaah ofcourse.. the extra Vector there..i totally forgot, thanks –  Jaanus Mar 13 '11 at 10:25
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template <unsigned short n>
Vector<n>::Vector(vector<float> crds) {
}

EDIT: As others mentioned, if you're not using namespace std; you also need std::vector<float>

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I would also include the std:: prefix before vector<float>, just to be coherent with the class declaration. And it might not work this way (we don't know if he has an using directive somewhere). –  kubi Mar 13 '11 at 10:21
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you probably miss std:: prefix in your vector<float>.

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1  
Then he wouldn't get that error. –  Erik Mar 13 '11 at 10:14
    
Yes, he would. Compiler can't recognize "vector" word. –  Frizi Mar 13 '11 at 10:16
    
@Erik: Its one possibility the variety of errors in the code mean it could be any one of multiple issues, alas :( –  Goz Mar 13 '11 at 10:17
    
That's likely also a problem, but the compilers error message is about the other problem. –  Erik Mar 13 '11 at 10:20
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Vector::Vector(constructor args) You just forgot to scope the constructor

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Should it be this?

template <> Vector<unsigned short>::Vector(Vector<float> crds) 
{
    // BLAH
}

It looks to me like you've got confused on template specialisation.

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