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I have a question about searching the JSON for the specific information. For example, I have this JSON file:

 {
    "people": {
        "person": [
            {
                "name": "Peter",
                "age": 43,
                "sex": "male"
            }, {
                "name": "Zara",
                "age": 65,
                "sex": "female"
            }
        ]
    }
}

My question is, how can find a particular person by name and display that person's age with jQuery? For example, I want to search the JSON for a person called Peter and when I find a match I want to display additional information about that match (about person named Peter in this case) such as person's age for example.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 34 down vote accepted
var json = {
    "people": {
        "person": [{
            "name": "Peter",
            "age": 43,
            "sex": "male"},
        {
            "name": "Zara",
            "age": 65,
            "sex": "female"}]
    }
};
$.each(json.people.person, function(i, v) {
    if (v.name == "Peter") {
        alert(v.age);
        return;
    }
});

Example.

Based on this answer, you could use something like:

$(function() {
    var json = {
        "people": {
            "person": [{
                "name": "Peter",
                "age": 43,
                "sex": "male"},
            {
                "name": "Zara",
                "age": 65,
                "sex": "female"}]
        }
    };
    $.each(json.people.person, function(i, v) {
        if (v.name.search(new RegExp(/peter/i)) != -1) {
            alert(v.age);
            return;
        }
    });
});

Example 2

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Your example works pretty well, but I was wondering can I somehow use something like this: [link]api.jquery.com/attribute-equals-selector to find my match? –  Mentalhead Mar 13 '11 at 11:30
    
@Mentalhead: updated my answer! –  ifaour Mar 13 '11 at 11:49
1  
One final question, is there a way to use standard jQuery selectors: [link]api.jquery.com/category/selectors to select and find the desired data or do I have to use the each() function? –  Mentalhead Mar 13 '11 at 12:23
1  
@Mentalhead: No, these methods are used to process DOM selectors. Also you want to loop over your object and the correct way to do so using jQuery is the jQuery method jQuery.each() –  ifaour Mar 13 '11 at 12:26
1  
I see, thank you for a detailed answer and a simple solution. –  Mentalhead Mar 13 '11 at 12:28

I found ifaour's example of jQuery.each() to be helpful, but would add that jQuery.each() can be broken (that is, stopped) by returning false at the point where you've found what you're searching for:

$.each(json.people.person, function(i, v) {
        if (v.name == "Peter") {
            // found it...
            alert(v.age);
            return false; // stops the loop
        }
});
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Thank you, this is quite useful. –  Mentalhead Aug 28 '11 at 9:33

There are some js-libraries, that could help you with it:

You might also want to take a look at Lawnchair, which is a JSON-Document-Store which works in the browser and has all sorts of querying-mechanisms.

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There's also Jsel - github.com/dragonworx/jsel - it uses a real XPath engine and allows you to customize your schema so you can create better expressions if needed. –  Ali Aug 13 '13 at 4:21
    
Lawnchair looks interesting .. any useful examples ?? –  UberNeo Oct 14 '13 at 21:38

Once you have the JSON loaded into a JavaScript object, it's no longer a jQuery problem but is now a JavaScript problem. In JavaScript you could for instance write a search such as:

var people = myJson["people"];
var persons = people["person"];
for(var i=0; i < persons.length; ++i) {
    var person_i = persons[i];
    if(person_i["name"] == mySearchForName) {
        // found ! do something with 'person_i'.
        break;
    }
}
// not found !
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Instead of people["person"] and person_i["name"] you can write people.person and person_i.name for short. –  rsp Mar 13 '11 at 10:54
    
What do you mean by it's no longer a jQuery problem but is now a JavaScript problem ?! –  ifaour Mar 13 '11 at 10:54
1  
His question seemed to have the pretense (by my reading, though I could be wrong) that jQuery selectors can be used to traverse JSON, which they can't to my knowledge. So I mean "a JavaScript problem" in the sense that jQuery's primary function and selector capability doesn't apply. –  DuckMaestro Mar 13 '11 at 20:59
    var GDNUtils = {};

GDNUtils.loadJquery = function () {
    var checkjquery = window.jQuery && jQuery.fn && /^1\.[3-9]/.test(jQuery.fn.jquery);
    if (!checkjquery) {

        var theNewScript = document.createElement("script");
        theNewScript.type = "text/javascript";
        theNewScript.src = "http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js";

        document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(theNewScript);

        // jQuery MAY OR MAY NOT be loaded at this stage


    }
};



GDNUtils.searchJsonValue = function (jsonData, keytoSearch, valuetoSearch, keytoGet) {
    GDNUtils.loadJquery();
    alert('here' + jsonData.length.toString());
    GDNUtils.loadJquery();

    $.each(jsonData, function (i, v) {

        if (v[keytoSearch] == valuetoSearch) {
            alert(v[keytoGet].toString());

            return;
        }
    });



};




GDNUtils.searchJson = function (jsonData, keytoSearch, valuetoSearch) {
    GDNUtils.loadJquery();
    alert('here' + jsonData.length.toString());
    GDNUtils.loadJquery();
    var row;
    $.each(jsonData, function (i, v) {

        if (v[keytoSearch] == valuetoSearch) {


            row  = v;
        }
    });

    return row;



}
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You could use Jsel - https://github.com/dragonworx/jsel.

It uses a real XPath engine and is highly customizable. Runs in both Node.js and the browser.

Given your original question, you'd find the people by name with:

// include or require jsel library (npm or browser)
var dom = jsel({
    "people": {
        "person": [{
            "name": "Peter",
            "age": 43,
            "sex": "male"},
        {
            "name": "Zara",
            "age": 65,
            "sex": "female"}]
    }
});
var person = dom.select("//person/*[@name='Peter']");
person.age === 43; // true

If you you were always working with the same JSON schema you could create your own schema with jsel, and be able to use shorter expressions like:

dom.select("//person[@name='Peter']")
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You can use DefiantJS (http://defiantjs.com) which extends the global object JSON with the method "search". With which you can query XPath queries on JSON structures. Example:

var byId = function(s) {return document.getElementById(s);},
data = {
   "people": {
      "person": [
         {
            "name": "Peter",
            "age": 43,
            "sex": "male"
         },
         {
            "name": "Zara",
            "age": 65,
            "sex": "female"
         }
      ]
   }
},
res = JSON.search( data, '//person[name="Peter"]' );

byId('name').innerHTML = res[0].name;
byId('age').innerHTML = res[0].age;
byId('sex').innerHTML = res[0].sex;

Here is a working fiddle;
http://jsfiddle.net/hbi99/NhL7p/

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I have kind of similar condition plus my Search Query not limited to particular Object property ( like "John" Search query should be matched with first_name and also with last_name property ). After spending some hours I got this function from Google's Angular project. They have taken care of every possible cases.

/* Seach in Object */

var comparator = function(obj, text) {
if (obj && text && typeof obj === 'object' && typeof text === 'object') {
    for (var objKey in obj) {
        if (objKey.charAt(0) !== '$' && hasOwnProperty.call(obj, objKey) &&
                comparator(obj[objKey], text[objKey])) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
text = ('' + text).toLowerCase();
return ('' + obj).toLowerCase().indexOf(text) > -1;
};

var search = function(obj, text) {
if (typeof text == 'string' && text.charAt(0) === '!') {
    return !search(obj, text.substr(1));
}
switch (typeof obj) {
    case "boolean":
    case "number":
    case "string":
        return comparator(obj, text);
    case "object":
        switch (typeof text) {
            case "object":
                return comparator(obj, text);
            default:
                for (var objKey in obj) {
                    if (objKey.charAt(0) !== '$' && search(obj[objKey], text)) {
                        return true;
                    }
                }
                break;
        }
        return false;
    case "array":
        for (var i = 0; i < obj.length; i++) {
            if (search(obj[i], text)) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    default:
        return false;
}
};
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