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I am using ctags to generate a tags file for a C project I am working on, but many functions are missing in the file. This appears to be caused by unbalanced braces in the source files due to using #ifdef. A (simplified) example:

#include <stdio.h>

struct mystruct {
        long member;
#ifndef _MSC_VER
}__attribute__ ((packed));
#else /* _MSC_VER */
};
#pragma pack(pop)
#endif /* _MSC_VER */

char* greeting_text(){
  return "Hello world\n";
}

int main( int argc, const char* argv[] ){
  char * greeting = greeting_text();
  printf(greeting);
  return 0;
}

This compiles and works flawlessly with gcc -Wall under Linux. However, if I parse it using ctags problem.c, the tags file only contains entries for mystruct -- the functions are missing.

ctags --verbose reports:

OPENING problem.c as C language file
problem.c: unexpected closing brace at line 8
problem.c: retrying file with fallback brace matching algorithm
OPENING problem.c as C language file
problem.c: unexpected closing brace at line 8

so apparently ctags does not like the preprocessor tricks in the file.

Is there a way to make ctags handle this?

The manpage of ctags even explicitly mentions this problem, but indicates ctags can work around this. However, this does not appear to work...

This is with Exuberant Ctags 5.8 (Debian package 1:5.8-4).

Edit:

I'm also interested in alternatives to ctags that handle these kinds of constructs.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because of the problems with ctags, I ended up using cscope instead.

While it's not perfect, it handles macros better than ctags, and it can integrate with vim just like ctags can (see http://vimdoc.sourceforge.net/htmldoc/if_cscop.html#:cscope ).

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I would try running the preprocessor (gcc -E) on the files before giving them to ctags. Whether this will produce a good result I am not certain, but it would be worth a try. Certainly all components of your code should appear then, but will ctags recognize the other-file references that gcc leaves in the output? Not sure.

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Good idea. However, the problem is that then the line numbers in the intermediate files which ctags processes will be different from the line numbers in the original source files, so using ctags to jump to the right line might not work. Still, I'll give it a try. –  sleske Mar 15 '11 at 11:41
    
Plus, this would also produces files which combine .h and .c files in one file, so it's unclear how ctags should find the original source file to jump to (as it might be either the .c file or one of the included .h files). I'll see... –  sleske Mar 15 '11 at 11:43
1  
The preprocessor output should include directives in it which indicate which files & lines the source chunks came from. Whether ctags will respect these is the question. –  John Zwinck Mar 15 '11 at 11:44
    
Looking further, I see that ctags has an option −−line−directives which appears to be intended specifically so ctags can successfully process perprocessor output and still find the lines in the original source files. Maybe this will actually work... –  sleske Mar 15 '11 at 11:47

You could try to rewrite the code so that there only is one closing brace, for example:

struct mystruct {
        long member;
}
#ifndef _MSC_VER
__attribute__ ((packed))
#endif
;
#ifdef _MSC_VER
#pragma pack(pop)
#endif /* _MSC_VER */

Of course, you can define some convenience macros to make it easier to read.

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Of course I could rewrite the code, but it's not my project, and I'd have to rewrite the code in dozens of places. I don't think that's a good solution to work around a bug / deficiency in ctags. –  sleske Mar 21 '11 at 11:17

You could run the unifdef tool to selectively (and temporarily) replace the inactive part of the code with blank lines (unifdef -l -U_MSC_VER). The result is

#include <stdio.h>

struct mystruct {
        long member;

}__attribute__ ((packed));





char* greeting_text(){
  return "Hello world\n";
}

int main( int argc, const char* argv[] ){
  char * greeting = greeting_text();
  printf(greeting);
  return 0;
}

Ctags has no problem parsing this correctly and the line numbers remain the same (important if you create ctags searches by line number):

$ cat tags
!_TAG_FILE_FORMAT       2       /extended format; --format=1 will not append ;" to lines/
!_TAG_FILE_SORTED       1       /0=unsorted, 1=sorted, 2=foldcase/
!_TAG_PROGRAM_AUTHOR    Darren Hiebert  /dhiebert@users.sourceforge.net/
!_TAG_PROGRAM_NAME      Exuberant Ctags //
!_TAG_PROGRAM_URL       http://ctags.sourceforge.net    /official site/
!_TAG_PROGRAM_VERSION   5.6     //
greeting_text   y.c     /^char* greeting_text(){$/;"    f
main    y.c     /^int main( int argc, const char* argv[] ){$/;" f
member  y.c     /^        long member;$/;"      m       struct:mystruct file:
mystruct        y.c     /^struct mystruct {$/;" s       file:

unifdef is available on many operating systems as a package (e.g. FreeBSD, various Linux distris, Cygwin). Homepage: http://dotat.at/prog/unifdef/

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Interesting idea (and interesting tool). Is this the "unifdef" you mean: dotat.at/prog/unifdef ? –  sleske Jan 16 at 10:33
    
@sleske Yup; it's available on many operating systems as a package (e.g. FreeBSD, various Linux distris, Cygwin). –  Jens Jan 16 at 10:37
    
@sleske Note that there are several versions out there. Some use -b instead of -l for blank line replacement. –  Jens Jan 16 at 10:44

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