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I need to optimize the following code to take less memory. I cant find out where the memory is being wasted. It is giving the correct results. The problem statement can be seen here http://www.codechef.com/problems/FLIPCOIN/

import java.util.Scanner;

public class FLIPCOIN4 {
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        //take N = no of coins, Q = no of commands as input
        String s =  in.nextLine();
        String[] str = s.split(" ");
        int N = Integer.parseInt(str[0]);
        int Q= Integer.parseInt(str[1]);
        int[] output = new int[Q];
        int[] input;
        //input - array of integers (one integer for 32 coins)
        if(N%32>0)
            input = new int[N/32 + 1];
        else
            input = new int[N/32];
        //initialize to 0 = tails
        for(int i=0;i<input.length;i++)
            {
                input[i] = 0;

            }
        int out = 0;
        int temp1 = 0;
        int temp2 = 0;
        int command = 0;
        int RangeL = 0;
        int RangeR = 0;
        //looping over all Q commands
        while(Q>0) {

            s = in.nextLine();
            str = s.split(" ");
            //command - command code
            //RangeL,RangeR - range of coins which are affected
            command = Integer.parseInt(str[0]);
            RangeL = Integer.parseInt(str[1]);
            RangeR = Integer.parseInt(str[2]);
            // command==0 => if coins are to be flipped
            if(command==0) {
                //if the coins range is over multiple numbers in array input[]
                if(RangeR/32>RangeL/32) {
                    if(RangeL%32==0)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ -1;
                    else if(RangeL%32==1)
                        input[RangeL/32] =
                            input[RangeL/32] ^ Integer.MAX_VALUE;
                    else
                        input[RangeL/32] =
                            input[RangeL/32] ^ (int)Math.pow(2, 32-(RangeL%32));

                    if(RangeR%32==0)
                        input[RangeR/32] = input[RangeL/8] ^ Integer.MIN_VALUE;
                    else 
                        input[RangeR/32] =
                            input[RangeR/8] ^
                            (Integer.MIN_VALUE
                             + ( Integer.MAX_VALUE +1-
                                 (int) Math.pow(2, 31-(RangeL%32))));
                    if(RangeR/32 - RangeL/32 > 1) {
                        for(int i=RangeL/32+1; i <RangeR/32 ; i++) {
                            input[i] = input[i] ^ -1;
                        }
                    }
                }//if the coins range is contained in one single integer in input[]
                else if(RangeR/32==RangeL/32) {
                    if(RangeL%32==0 && RangeR%32==0)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^
                            Integer.MIN_VALUE;
                    else if(RangeL%32==0 && RangeR%32==1)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ 
                            (Integer.MIN_VALUE + (int) Math.pow(2, 30));
                    else if(RangeL%32==0 && RangeR%32 >1)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ 
                            (Integer.MIN_VALUE +  Integer.MAX_VALUE +1 -
                             (int) Math.pow(2, 31-(RangeR%32)));
                    else if(RangeL%32==1 && RangeR%32 ==1)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ 
                            (int) Math.pow(2, 30);
                    else if(RangeL%32==1 && RangeR%32 >1)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ 
                            (Integer.MAX_VALUE +1 -
                             (int) Math.pow(2, 31-(RangeR%32)));
                    else
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^
                            ((int) Math.pow(2, 32-(RangeL%32)) -
                             (int) Math.pow(2, 31-(RangeR%32)) );


                }
            }// command==1 => no of heads is to be reported
            else if(command==1) {//if the coins range is contained in a single integer
                if(RangeR/32 == RangeL/32) {
                    temp1 = input[RangeL/32]<< RangeL%32;
                    temp1 = temp1 >>> RangeL%32;
                    temp1 = temp1 >>> (31 - RangeR%32);
                    temp1 = temp1 << (31 - RangeR%32);
                    output[out] = Integer.bitCount(temp1);
                }
                //if the coins range is over multiple numbers in array input[]
                else if(RangeR/32>RangeL/32) {
                    temp1 = input[RangeL/32]<< RangeL%32;
                    temp1 = temp1 >>> RangeL%32;

                    temp2 = input[RangeL/32] >>> (31 - RangeR%32);

                    temp2 = temp2 << (31 - RangeR%32);
                    output[out] =
                        Integer.bitCount(temp1)+ Integer.bitCount(temp2);

                }

                if(RangeR/32 - RangeL/32 > 1) {
                    for(int i=RangeL/32+1; i <RangeR/32 ; i++) {
                        output[out] = output[out] + Integer.bitCount(input[i]);
                    }
                }
                out++;
            }
            Q--;
        }
        for(int i =0;i<out;i++) {
            System.out.println(output[i]);
        }
    }
}
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5  
That's ... that's the least concise code I've ever seen –  Johan Sjöberg Mar 13 '11 at 16:21
1  
Pro tip: use comments in your code, would be easier for the people who will correct, as well as the ones trying to help you. –  M'vy Mar 13 '11 at 16:22
    
Could you write your code here in a more legible way? And the variable names in a more explicatory way, as well. –  Ahmet Altun Mar 13 '11 at 16:23
    
You might want to run a profiler like JProfiler or jvisualvm. –  asgs Mar 13 '11 at 16:23
3  
How did you determine that your code is using too much memory? –  Mat Mar 13 '11 at 16:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Some general remarks about your program (not really related to the memory problem, but may help to solve it):

import java.util.Scanner;

public class FLIPCOIN4 {

Your class name is a bit strange - was this somehow mandated by the task? (In Java, for class name one usually uses camel-case. FlipCoin would be an example here.)

    public static void main(String args[])
    {

You are doing all your processing inside this really large method. Better structure your code, put it in several methods which each have only one task.

        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        //take N = no of coins, Q = no of commands as input
        String s =  in.nextLine();
        String[] str = s.split(" ");
        int N = Integer.parseInt(str[0]);
        int Q= Integer.parseInt(str[1]);

The Scanner class has more methods than only nextLine() - if you would use directly nextInt, your program would be shorter by quite a bit.

        int[] output = new int[Q];

What do you need the output array for? You could simply output each number as soon as produced. This would save you 200 kB (if their test input has really Q=50000).

        int[] input;
        //input - array of integers (one integer for 32 coins)
        if(N%32>0)
            input = new int[N/32 + 1];
        else
            input = new int[N/32];

You could have used [(N-1)/32 +1] here and avoid the two cases, but I'm not sure this is really more readable.

The input array has a wrong name: it is not the input, but it represents the current state of the coins.

        //initialize to 0 = tails
        for(int i=0;i<input.length;i++)
            {
                input[i] = 0;
            }

Array elements are automatically initialized with 0 (or '\0' or 0.0 or null), so this loop is totally unnecessary.

        int out = 0;
        int temp1 = 0;
        int temp2 = 0;
        int command = 0;
        int RangeL = 0;
        int RangeR = 0;

Most of these variables would be better declared (and initialized) where they are first used.

        //looping over all Q commands
        while(Q>0) {

            s = in.nextLine();
            str = s.split(" ");
            //command - command code
            //RangeL,RangeR - range of coins which are affected
            command = Integer.parseInt(str[0]);
            RangeL = Integer.parseInt(str[1]);
            RangeR = Integer.parseInt(str[2]);

As said before, you could have used in.nextInt() here as easily.

I also think the s.split method is creating a new regex-Pattern each time, which does not take too long, but still is superfluous.

            // command==0 => if coins are to be flipped

And for the commands, you would not really need to parse it as an int, using String comparison would work too.

            if(command==0) {
                //if the coins range is over multiple numbers in array input[]
                if(RangeR/32>RangeL/32) {
                    if(RangeL%32==0)

You are using the four numbers RangeR/32, RangeL/32, RangeR%32 and RangeL%32 over and over again. Assign them to proper variables (or even constants, with final) - this firstly would make your program a bit faster, and (more importantly) more legible, if you are using the right names.

                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ -1;
                    else if(RangeL%32==1)
                        input[RangeL/32] =
                            input[RangeL/32] ^ Integer.MAX_VALUE;
                    else
                        input[RangeL/32] =
                            input[RangeL/32] ^ (int)Math.pow(2, 32-(RangeL%32));

Don't use Math.pow for integer exponentation with small powers of two.

2x is writable as 1 << x (if 0 <= x < 32).

                    if(RangeR%32==0)
                        input[RangeR/32] = input[RangeL/8] ^ Integer.MIN_VALUE;
                    else 
                        input[RangeR/32] =
                            input[RangeR/8] ^
                            (Integer.MIN_VALUE
                             + ( Integer.MAX_VALUE +1-
                                 (int) Math.pow(2, 31-(RangeL%32))));

Huh, this is a cruel formula. Did you know that Integer.MAX_VALUE + 1 == Integer.MIN_VALUE?

                    if(RangeR/32 - RangeL/32 > 1) {
                        for(int i=RangeL/32+1; i <RangeR/32 ; i++) {
                            input[i] = input[i] ^ -1;
                        }
                    }

Your loop would work the same without the if-check before (it would be a empty loop then).

                }//if the coins range is contained in one single integer in input[]
                else if(RangeR/32==RangeL/32) {

This comment looks like it would relate to the closing brace, while it in reality relates to the following if.

                    if(RangeL%32==0 && RangeR%32==0)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^
                            Integer.MIN_VALUE;
                    else if(RangeL%32==0 && RangeR%32==1)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ 
                            (Integer.MIN_VALUE + (int) Math.pow(2, 30));
                    else if(RangeL%32==0 && RangeR%32 >1)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ 
                            (Integer.MIN_VALUE +  Integer.MAX_VALUE +1 -
                             (int) Math.pow(2, 31-(RangeR%32)));
                    else if(RangeL%32==1 && RangeR%32 ==1)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ 
                            (int) Math.pow(2, 30);
                    else if(RangeL%32==1 && RangeR%32 >1)
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^ 
                            (Integer.MAX_VALUE +1 -
                             (int) Math.pow(2, 31-(RangeR%32)));
                    else
                        input[RangeL/32] = input[RangeL/32] ^
                            ((int) Math.pow(2, 32-(RangeL%32)) -
                             (int) Math.pow(2, 31-(RangeR%32)) );

As said before: put this in another method, and don't use Math.pow.

                }
            }// command==1 => no of heads is to be reported
            else if(command==1) {//if the coins range is contained in a single integer
                if(RangeR/32 == RangeL/32) {
                    temp1 = input[RangeL/32]<< RangeL%32;
                    temp1 = temp1 >>> RangeL%32;
                    temp1 = temp1 >>> (31 - RangeR%32);
                    temp1 = temp1 << (31 - RangeR%32);

Ah, you know how to bit-shift :-)

Instead of shifting the bits off, you could have masked them, too. final int mask = 1<<(32-RangeL%32) - 1<<(31-RangeR%32), or similar, and then temp1 = mask & input[RangeL/32].

                    output[out] = Integer.bitCount(temp1);
                }
                //if the coins range is over multiple numbers in array input[]
                else if(RangeR/32>RangeL/32) {
                    temp1 = input[RangeL/32]<< RangeL%32;
                    temp1 = temp1 >>> RangeL%32;

                    temp2 = input[RangeL/32] >>> (31 - RangeR%32);

                    temp2 = temp2 << (31 - RangeR%32);
                    output[out] =
                        Integer.bitCount(temp1)+ Integer.bitCount(temp2);
                }

                if(RangeR/32 - RangeL/32 > 1) {
                    for(int i=RangeL/32+1; i <RangeR/32 ; i++) {
                        output[out] = output[out] + Integer.bitCount(input[i]);
                    }
                }

What I said before is valid for this loop, too.

                out++;

At this point you could output the result, and not have this array at all.

            }
            Q--;
        }
        for(int i =0;i<out;i++) {
            System.out.println(output[i]);
        }

(This output would be not necessary then.)

    }
}

Another thing to think about: If you ordered the bits the other way around, you would not have to use these subtractions in the exponents everywhere.

And using something like java.util.BitSet would make your whole program very short, since this does all the bit-logic for you.

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(I wrote this 14 hours ago, but then my internet connection broke down.) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 14 '11 at 11:18

So, lets take a look at your program, especially your memory allocations.

    int[] output = new int[Q];
    int[] input;
    //input - array of integers (one integer for 32 coins)
    if(N%32>0)
        input = new int[N/32 + 1];
    else
        input = new int[N/32];

Here you are creating two big arrays. If N and Q are both maximally 50000, these should only take 206250 bytes, plus a bit overhead.

        s = in.nextLine();
        str = s.split(" ");

This is done in a loop, each creates a new string (read from the input) and a new string[]. Maybe also a new Regexp-pattern and matcher (I don't know whether those are chached). But anyway, you retain these objects only until the next iteration, so the garbage collector should be able to throw them away.

All in all, there is no real reason your program should take 177 MB for running with a 50000 (short) lines long input.

I think the evaluation program of CodeChef is a bit stupid, and you should not worry about what it said. Maybe it gives the programs an very big heap so they would not need to do any garbage collection, and then kills them when they reach 177 MB. (It rejected my answer, too, for running too long.)

I'll give you some general tips about your program in another answer.

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