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I'm trying to wrap my head around organising my code. I have several modules within my project, which I'd like to organise.

The point is that all what has come to my mind doesn't work out. I'm currently thinking of four ideas:

  1. Simple object - Is not useful due to scoping issues. Using this.a would work, but this has a different meaning depending on who called it so it's not reliable. For example, I once assigned a function to a WebSocket class, but all of a sudden this referred to the WebSocket instance when the function was called by a WebSocket event. I could use bind(foo) each time I call the function, but there must be another way I guess.

    var foo = {
        a: 3,
        s: function() {
            alert(a); // a doesn't exist in this scope
            alert(this.a); // 'this' isn't always foo
            alert(foo.a); // I would have to put 'foo.' before each variable
                          // reference, but I'm sure that's not the way to do it
       }
    };
    
  2. Instance - a is not defined. Again, this isn't reliable.

    var foo = function() {
        this.a = 3;
        this.s = function() {
            alert(a);
        };
    };
    var foo_instance = new foo();
    foo_instance.a = 4;
    foo_instance.s(); // Error: a is not defined
    
  3. Closure with instance - Doesn't return anything; it stays undefined.

    var foo = (function() {
        this.a = 3;
        this.s = function() {
            alert(a);
        };
    })();
    // foo === undefined
    
  4. Closure with getter/setter - Works beautifully on Chrome, however IE doesn't support getters/setters.

    var foo = (function() {
        var a = 3;
        return {
            get a() { return a; },
            set a(v) { a = v; },
    
            s: function() {
                alert(a); // Doesn't work in IE as getters/setters are
                          // not supported
            }
        };
    })();
    

How would I effectively organise my modules, so that I can access the properties safely and in a cross-browser way?

Thanks.

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for #2, you must alert this.a not just a –  Jason Miesionczek Mar 13 '11 at 17:56
    
@Jason Miesionczek: Will this there always refer to the instance of foo? –  pimvdb Mar 13 '11 at 18:01
    
inside the function, yes. using 'this' outside of a function refers to the global object. –  Jason Miesionczek Mar 13 '11 at 18:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems to me that you have no real understand of how this and closures work in JavaScript.

Please read up on both of these topics and also have a look at namespaces.

There are a ton of different ways how one could realize modules, but it doesn't make much sense to talk about it here unless you understand the basics, so please refer to my links for a in-depth explanation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I admit that I'm not a professional, so I'll go ahead with that article and try to invent something that fits my needs. –  pimvdb Mar 13 '11 at 17:47

3 is undefined because you are not returning anything. instead of assigning properties and methods to 'this', try this:

var foo = (function() {
    var self = {};

    self.someProperty = someValue;

    self.someFunction = function () {

    }

    return self;
}());

foo will now return an object with the properties and methods defined. doing it this way you never have to wonder what 'this' is actually referring to.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks alot. Is it correct though that whenever I want to access the property from within someFunction, I have to use self.someProperty? I.e. when one has an object foo with a function func and a variable bar, does he always have to use foo.bar within foo.func? –  pimvdb Mar 13 '11 at 18:00
    
yeah because by using self you are defining the public interface for that module. to access that object from itself, you must reference self. if you define and variables or functions inside that module that are not attached to self, those become private variables and functions and can be referenced as normal (just remember to use var otherwise they will become global which is not ideal). –  Jason Miesionczek Mar 13 '11 at 18:04

Your first code snippet uses a closure, and corresponds to a pattern that was made popular by the yui library. The second pattern corresponds to the notion of private, public and privileged members of an object.

I recommend that you read this staple article about javascript private members by Douglas Crockford, and go either with the first option or the second. They are semantically equivalent.

(The third and the forth snippets seem overly complex to me in comparison to the first two)

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