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Is there a Mutex object in java or a way to create one? I am asking because a Semaphore object initialized with 1 permit does not help me. Think of this case:

try {
   semaphore.acquire();
   //do stuff
   semaphore.release();
} catch (Exception e) {
   semaphore.release();
}

if an exception happens at the first acquire, the release in the catch block will increase the permits, and the semaphore is no longer a binary semaphore.

Will the correct way be?

try {
   semaphore.acquire();
   //do stuff
} catch (Exception e) {
   //exception stuff
} finally {
   semaphore.release();
}

Will the above code ensure that the semaphore will be binary?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 46 down vote accepted

See this page: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/javase/index-140767.html

It has a slightly different pattern which is (I think) what you are looking for:

try {
  mutex.acquire();
  try {
    // do something
  } finally {
    mutex.release();
  }
} catch(InterruptedException ie) {
  // ...
}

In this usage, you're only calling release() after a successful acquire()

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Any object in Java can be used as a lock using a synchronized block. This will also automatically take care of releasing the lock when an exception occurs.

Object someObject = ...;

synchronized (someObject) {
  ...
}

You can read more about this here: Intrinsic Locks and Synchronization

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Very helpful buy i wanted to use a semaphore. –  Noam Nevo Mar 13 '11 at 17:41
6  
@Noam: just compare the code with semaphore and with synchronized, you'll see what is better readable and less error-prone. –  Vlad Mar 13 '11 at 19:11
    
The synchronized keyword cannot be used if you expect to release the lock in a different method (e.g. transaction.begin(); transaction.commit()). –  Hosam Aly May 29 at 22:13
import java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;


private final Lock _mutex = new ReentrantLock(true);

_mutex.lock();

// your protected code here

_mutex.unlock();
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3  
In what way is this superior to the solutions already provided? How does it solve the problem the original asker was having? –  Martin Sep 23 '12 at 1:19

To ensure that a Semaphore is binary you just need to make sure you pass in the number of permits as 1 when creating the semaphore. The Javadocs have a bit more explanation.

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Each object's lock is little differ from Mutex\Semaphore design. For example there is no way to correctly implement traversing linked nodes with releasing previous node's lock and capturing next one. But with mutex it is easy to implement:

Node p = getHead();
if (p == null || x == null) return false;
p.lock.acquire();  // Prime loop by acquiring first lock.
// If above acquire fails due to interrupt, the method will
//   throw InterruptedException now, so there is no need for
//   further cleanup.
for (;;) {
Node nextp = null;
boolean found;
try { 
 found = x.equals(p.item); 
 if (!found) { 
   nextp = p.next; 
   if (nextp != null) { 
     try {      // Acquire next lock 
                //   while still holding current 
       nextp.lock.acquire(); 
     } 
     catch (InterruptedException ie) { 
      throw ie;    // Note that finally clause will 
                   //   execute before the throw 
     } 
   } 
 } 
}finally {     // release old lock regardless of outcome 
   p.lock.release();
} 

Currently, there is no such class in java.util.concurrent, but you can find Mutext implementation here Mutex.java. As for standard libraries, Semaphore provides all this functionality and much more.

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Mistake in original post is acquire() call set inside the try loop. Here is a correct approach to use "binary" semaphore (Mutex):

semaphore.acquire();
try {
   //do stuff
} catch (Exception e) {
   //exception stuff
} finally {
   semaphore.release();
}
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If you only want one thread in the critical section at a time check out synchronized methods or locks.

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The synchronised method link that you provided is broken. –  GreenAsJade Oct 10 '13 at 0:03

Look at the javadoc for java.util.concurrent.locks.AbstractQueuedSynchronizer. It has an example of how to write a Mutex class.

-dbednar

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