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I create a table with name "temp1" - It has a primary key with name aa and some other fields. And I have another table with name temp2.

I want to add foreign key to it with name cc.

I wrote below code but it have some errors:

create table temp1 (    
  aa int,    
  primary key(aa)    
);

create table temp2 (
  bb int,
  cc int,
  primary key(bb),
  foreign key(cc) references temp1
);

..But it have this error:

can't create table 'temp.temp2'

temp is my database name.

Edit:

I insert data into aa(primary key in temp1) but it doesn't import into

cc(foreign key in temp2).

why?

I thought if insert data in primary key it automatic insert into

foreign key!!if this true?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to specify the foreign field you're linking to as well:

foreign key (cc) references temp1 (aa)

within the create table statement, or

alter table temp2 add foreign key (cc) references temp1 (aa)

afterwards. As well, your SQL for table temp1 is faulty - there's no field a to create a primary key on - I'm guessing that's just a typo in your question.

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From the MySQL foreign key documentation:

If MySQL reports an error number 1005 from a CREATE TABLE statement, and the error message refers to error 150, table creation failed because a foreign key constraint was not correctly formed.

Reviewing your query, that is correct - you need to use:

CREATE TABLE temp2 (
  bb int,
  cc int,
  PRIMARY KEY (bb),
  FOREIGN KEY (cc) REFERENCES temp1(aa)
);

When making a foreign key constraint, you need to specify the column the foreign key relates to in the parent table. SQL doesn't assume you want the primary key column, because there could be others.

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Your code is valid Standard SQL-92 syntax.

You can test this using the online Mimer SQL-92 Validator.

You can verify this by reading the SQL-92 spec, 11.8 "referential constraint definition", 2b):

If the referenced table and columns does not specify a reference column list, then the table descriptor of the referenced table shall include a unique constraint that specifies PRIMARY KEY.

Sadly, mySQL is not SQL-92 compliant and it seems the reference column list is required.

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