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Does msvc have analog of gcc's ({ }).

I assume the answer is no.
Plase note that this is question of compiler capabilities, not question of taste or style.

Not that I recommend anybody to start using the ({}) construct by ths question.

The reference to ({}) construct is: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-2.95.3/gcc_4.html#SEC62 officially called "Statements and Declarations in Expressions". It allows to embed statements (like for, goto) and declarations into expressions.

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1  
Can I ask a reference to the construct? Thanks! –  xanatos Mar 13 '11 at 18:49
    
I second xanatos. What does it do/mean? –  0xC0000022L Mar 13 '11 at 18:51
1  
@xanatos, @STATUS_ACCESS_DENIED: It allows you to have a block of statements that evaluate to a value. It's very useful for writing macros. It's an idea borrowed from lisp in which every grouping of statements is like that. –  Omnifarious Mar 13 '11 at 19:11
    
Do you refer to vector<int> a({1, 2, 3}) ? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 13 '11 at 19:15
    
xanatos, Jonannes: It's gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-2.95.3/gcc_4.html#SEC62 officially called "Statements and Declarations in Expressions". It allows to embed statements (like for, goto) and declarations into expressions. –  Andrei Mar 13 '11 at 20:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, it does not contain an equivalent form.

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In some way, yes. This is a compound statement expression, which one could consider like a lambda function that is immediately called, and only called once.

Recent versions of MSVC should support lambda functions, so that would be something like:

[](){ /* your compound statement expression here */ }();

EDIT: removed a surplus parenthesis

EDIT 2: For your amusement, here is an example of how to use either variation with some (admittedly totally silly) real code. Don't mind too much the actual usefulness of the code, but how expressive it is and how nicely the compiler even optimizes it:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    unsigned int a =
        ({
            unsigned int count = 0;
            const char* str = "a silly thing";
            for(unsigned int i = 0; i < strlen(str); ++i)
                count += str[i] == 'i' ? 1 : 0;
            count;
        });

    unsigned int b =
        [](){
            unsigned int count = 0;
            const char* str = "a silly thing";
            for(unsigned int i = 0; i < strlen(str); ++i)
                count += str[i] == 'i' ? 1 : 0;
            return count;
        }();

    printf("Number of 'i' : %u\t%u\n", a, b);

    return 0;
}

... which gcc 4.5 compiles to:

movl    $2, 8(%esp)
movl    $2, 4(%esp)
movl    $LC0, (%esp)
call    _printf
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That's kind of twisted. –  Omnifarious Mar 13 '11 at 19:09
    
Hey... it's like Javascript! I knew I could leverage my JS knowledge to program C++!!! Now I'll only need JQuery++! :-) :-) –  xanatos Mar 13 '11 at 19:14
    
It is actually quite cool, you can use that for example to initialize a variable with an entire little program, and if the compiler can prove that the return value only depends on constants, it will do the whole calculation at compile time, and apart from the ugly ({}) syntax, it is very expressive, too. That kind of thing has been working super fine with gcc for ages, only unluckily in a very non-standard way. Lambda is much superior, because it is standard and allows you to supply parameters and has global access control. –  Damon Mar 13 '11 at 19:16
    
The drawback of lambdas is that they cannot break or continue enclosing loops. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 13 '11 at 19:31
    
Funnily, compound statement expressions can... but I would't know what one would want to use that for. –  Damon Mar 13 '11 at 20:11

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