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I created an implementation of list that functions with a test main program that was given to me. I am aware that not all of the proper functions of list are implemented in the program and I am okay with that.

Here is the code I created:

#include <iostream> 
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

template <class T> class Link;
template <class T> class List_iterator;

template <class T> 
class List
{
public:
   typedef List_iterator<T> iterator;

   List();
   List(const List<T> & l);
   ~List();

   bool empty() const;
   unsigned int size() const; 
   T & back() const;
   T & front() const;
   void push_front(const T & x);
   void push_back(const T & x);
   void pop_front();
   void pop_back();
   iterator begin() const;
   iterator end() const;
   void insert(iterator pos, const T & x);
   void erase(iterator & pos); 
   List<T> & operator=(const List<T> & l);

protected:
   Link<T> * first_link;
   Link<T> * last_link;
   unsigned int my_size;
};

template <class T>
List<T>::List()
{
        first_link = 0;
        last_link = 0;
        my_size = 0;
}

template <class T>
List<T>::List(const List & l)
{
        first_link = 0;
        last_link = 0;
        my_size = 0;
        for (Link<T> * current = l.first_link; current != 0; current = current -> next_link)
                push_back(current -> value);
}

template <class T>
typename List<T>::iterator List<T>::begin() const
{
        return iterator(first_link);
}

template <class T> 
class Link 
{
private:
   Link(const T & x): value(x), next_link(0), prev_link(0) {}//pg. 204 

   T value;     
   Link<T> * next_link;
   Link<T> * prev_link;

   friend class List<T>;
   friend class List_iterator<T>;
};

template <class T> class List_iterator//pg.207
{
public:
   typedef List_iterator<T> iterator;

   List_iterator(Link<T> * source_link): current_link(source_link) { }
   List_iterator(): current_link(0) { }
   List_iterator(List_iterator<T> * source_iterator): current_link(source_iterator.current_link) { }

   T & operator*();  // dereferencing operator
   iterator & operator=(const iterator & rhs);
   bool operator==(const iterator & rhs) const;
   bool operator!=(const iterator & rhs) const;
   iterator & operator++(); 
   iterator operator++(int);
   iterator & operator--(); 
   iterator operator--(int); 

protected:
   Link<T> * current_link;

   friend class List<T>;
};

template <class T>
T & List_iterator<T>::operator*()
{
        return current_link -> value;
}

template <class T>
List_iterator<T> & List_iterator<T>::operator++()
{
        current_link = current_link -> next_link;
        return *this;
}

template <class T>
void List<T>::push_back(const T & x)
{
    Link<T> * new_link = new Link<T> (x);
    if (first_link == 0)
    first_link = last_link = new_link;
    else
    {
    new_link->prev_link = last_link;
        last_link->next_link = new_link;    
        last_link = new_link;
    }
    my_size++;
}

template <class T>
typename List<T>::iterator List<T>::end() const
{
        return iterator(last_link);
}

template <class T>
List <T>::~List()
{
    Link <T> * first = first_link;
    while (first != 0)
    {
    Link <T> * next = first->next_link;
        delete first;
    first = next;
    }
}

template<class T>
bool List_iterator<T>::operator==(const iterator & rhs) const
{
    return ( this->current_link == rhs.current_link ); 
}

template <class T>
bool List_iterator<T>::operator!=(const iterator & rhs) const
{
    return !( *this == rhs );
}

int main()
{
   List<int> l;

   l.push_back(44);  // list = 44
   l.push_back(33);  // list = 44, 33
   l.push_back(11);  // list = 44, 33, 11
   l.push_back(22);  // list = 44, 33, 11, 22

   List<int> m(l);

   List<int>::iterator itr(m.begin());
   while (itr != m.end()) {
        cout << *itr << endl;
        ++itr;
   }
}

When the program is run, only the first three elements in the list are displayed in the terminal and I am unsure why that is. Can anyone point out the reason for me?

Also, if I wanted to add the operator [], that displays a specific element in the list, how would I do that? For example:

cout << l[2]; // would display 33

There is no example in the textbook I am using, so any help would be great.

share|improve this question
    
Please don't use a lower case 'L' as a variable. It looks so much like a 1 (one) it's more than a little confusing. –  John Gordon Mar 13 '11 at 19:58
    
@ John Gordon - You're right, it does, I will keep that in mind. –  navlag Mar 13 '11 at 20:00
    
@Mikhailovich: A good convention for copy/move constructor and assignment operator is to name the variable as const List<T>& other. :) –  Xeo Mar 13 '11 at 20:44

2 Answers 2

The reason why you're only seeing the first three elements is that List_iterator::end returns the last node in the list, whereas it needs to return something "past the end of the list".

An operator[] to do what you want would need to follow next_link pointers the given number of times.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by past the end of the list? –  navlag Mar 13 '11 at 20:06
    
You can add a default node to each created list that is "end" which is always the last node. When you do the check "while (itr != m.end())" the value in m.end() is actually the node with 22 in it, but you are not executing the block in that case. –  Brandon Mar 13 '11 at 20:20
    
@Mikhailovich: if your list has 4 elements, then the iterator must support 5 different values relating to that list. The value returned by begin() points to the first element. Increment that, and you get an iterator value that points the second element. Increment again, third element, again, fourth. Increment again, you get the value returned by end(). The end() iterator doesn't point to anything (hence "past-the-end"), and it is not valid to increment this value. That's how iterators work, and the code in the main function relies on it. –  Steve Jessop Mar 13 '11 at 20:30

In c++ standard library, end() always returns an iterator to the first element not in a list. This allows you to do as you do in main, while (itr != m.end()) - As soon as you increment past the last element in a container, the loop condition is false, and the loop is done.

Consider e.g. a simple array of char.

char a[3] = { '1', '2', '3' };

char * begin = a;  // First element in a
char * end = a + 3; // First element **after** a
char * current = begin;
while (current != end) {
  cout << *current;
  ++current;
}

When current points to the '3', you output it, then increment. current now points to the first element after the array a, and the loop is done.

Your 'end()' function returns an iterator to the last element - so your loop will be executed for everything except the last element - this corresponds to changing the above snippet so it says char * end = a + 2; // Last element in a, and that will lead to the loop stopping when it gets to '3' instead of after it is done with '3'

You'll need to either change your iterator to support a concept of "one past end", or you'll need to change your loop construct to account for your not-entirely-conventional iterator.

share|improve this answer
    
I used Link<T> * end = last_link + 1; and it now displays all four elements but also says segmentation fault after the elements are displayed, is there a reason for that? –  navlag Mar 13 '11 at 20:52
    
That won't work - you need to construct a "special" value which indicates end of list, e.g use 0. And make sure you check for 0 before you dereference –  Erik Mar 13 '11 at 20:56

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