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void findodd(int a[])
{
  int hash[100];
  int i;
  int c[100]={0};
  for(i=0;i<6;i++)
  { 
    c[a[i]]=c[a[i]]+1;
    hash[a[i]]=c[a[i]];
    if(c[a[i]]%2==0)
      hash[a[i]]=0;
  }
  for(i=0;i<6;i++)
    if(hash[a[i]]!=0)
      cout<<a[i];
}
int main()
{
  int a[] = {1,3,3,5,5,5};
  findodd(a);
  return 0;
}

The program is to find the integers which occur odd number of times in the array. Here is the link to the above program.

share|improve this question
    
What is the question? –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 13 '11 at 20:53
    
How can I remove the duplicates in O(n) running time? –  Ava Mar 13 '11 at 20:54
    
Maybe you should put that in the question itself... –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 13 '11 at 20:55
    
Its there.. the title of the post is the Question itself –  Ava Mar 13 '11 at 20:56
    
Do you want to remove duplicates ? Or find the ones that exist odd times ? –  GeorgeAl Mar 13 '11 at 21:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>

void find_odd(int a[])
{
    int hash[101] = { 0 };
    int i;
    for( i = 0 ; i < 6 ; i++ )
    { 
        hash[ a[i] ]++;
    }

    for(i=0 ; i<100 ; i++)
        if(hash[i] != 0 && !(hash[i] % 2 == 0))
            std::cout << i << std::endl;    
}

int main()
{
    int a[] = {1,3,3,5,5,5};
    find_odd(a);
    return 0;
}

But you might be better of using std::vector and/or std::map.


With negatives : but only in the range -100 -> +100. You cant have a negative array index, so just +100 to all and have the hash array from 0 to 200.

#include <iostream>

void find_odd(int a[])
{
    int hash[201] = { 0 };
    int i;
    for( i = 0 ; i < 9 ; i++ )
    { 
        hash[ a[i]+100 ]++;
    }

    for(i=0 ; i<201 ; i++)
        if(hash[i] != 0 && !(hash[i] % 2 == 0))
            std::cout << i-100 << std::endl;    
}

int main()
{
    int a[] = {-1 , -1 , -1 , 1 , 3 , 3 , 5 , 5 , 5};
    find_odd(a);
    return 0;
}

With std::vector and std::map (works both for positive and negative numbers)

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>

void find_odd_mapped(std::vector<int>& a)
{
    std::map<int , int> hash;
    std::map<int , int>::iterator map_iter;
    std::vector<int>::iterator vec_iter;

    for( vec_iter = a.begin() ; vec_iter != a.end() ; ++vec_iter )
        ++hash[*vec_iter];


    for(map_iter = hash.begin() ; map_iter != hash.end() ; ++map_iter)
        if(!((*map_iter).second % 2 == 0))
            std::cout << (*map_iter).first << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> a;
    a.push_back(-1);
    a.push_back(-1);
    a.push_back(-1);
    a.push_back(1);
    a.push_back(3);
    a.push_back(3);
    a.push_back(5);
    a.push_back(5);
    a.push_back(5);
    find_odd_mapped(a);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Muggen Whats 0b01? –  Ava Mar 13 '11 at 21:18
    
@imagi, it checks whether it is even or odd. you could write hash[i] % 2 == 0 too but this does not work for negative numbers. –  GeorgeAl Mar 13 '11 at 21:19
    
@Muggen Works for positive numbers. 0b01 is giving error? –  Ava Mar 13 '11 at 21:30
    
@imagine, you are not using gcc are you ? ok will fix. –  GeorgeAl Mar 13 '11 at 21:32
    
I am running it on codeblocks.org –  Ava Mar 13 '11 at 21:32

Given that your algorithm already runs on O(n), I assume you are looking to erase the duplicate entries in your output. One possible solution is:

void findodd(int a[])
{
  int hash[100];
  int i;
  int c[100]={0};

  int hashdup[100];
  memset(hashdup, 0, sizeof(int)*100);

  for(i=0;i<6;i++)
  { 
    c[a[i]]=c[a[i]]+1;
    hash[a[i]]=c[a[i]];
    if(c[a[i]]%2==0)
      hash[a[i]]=0;
  }
  for(i=0;i<6;i++)
  {
    if(hash[a[i]]!=0)
      hashdup[a[i]]++;
    if (hashdup[a[i]]==1)
      cout<<a[i];
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Woah never knew this. Thanks! –  Ava Mar 13 '11 at 21:19

the only point is if you know boundries for your entries or not, if there is a limited types of input then all the codes above would work but if you don't know the boundries or if the boundries are too high (for example you have an integer range of entries) then even the best algorithm use O(nlogn) to remove dublicate entries.

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