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I have your basic asp.net web form which contains some client-side JavaScript that forces the page to time out and then redirect after 5 minutes. Mainly to protect possibly sensitive information.

At timeout, I want to force a server post back allowing me to save the form values for future edits.

I have played with both ClientScript.GetPostBackClientHyperlink() and ClientScript.GetPostBackEventReference(). Both seem to cause EventValidation issues for me. Yes, I can turn off Event Validation but is there a different or better workaournd?

Ideally, I don’t want to invoke a control (which has to be displayed) but just cause a postback with some type of argument that I can recognize serverside as being the result of a timeout condition.

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4 Answers 4

This may be overkill, but you could setup a javascript timer to fire a web service call. The .NET web service can accept the form data and save it.

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Couldn't you use a javascript timer to "click" the submit button? It sounds like using this form would be really annoying though, if it keeps posting back while you're trying to fill it out.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

No great solutions so I build my own. A pretty simple custom control. Comments welcome.

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

namespace BinaryOcean.Web.Library.WebControls
{
    [ToolboxData("<{0}:PostBackTimer runat=\"server\" />"), DefaultProperty("Seconds"), DefaultEvent("Timeout")]
    public class PostBackTimer : Control, IPostBackEventHandler
    {
        public PostBackTimer() { }

        public string CommandArgument
        {
            get { return (string)ViewState["CommandArgument"] ?? string.Empty; }
            set { ViewState["CommandArgument"] = value; }
        }

        public string CommandName
        {
            get { return (string)ViewState["CommandName"] ?? string.Empty; }
            set { ViewState["CommandName"] = value; }
        }

        public bool Enabled
        {
            get { return (bool)(ViewState["Enabled"] ?? true); }
            set { ViewState["Enabled"] = value; }
        }

        public int Seconds
        {
            get { return (int)(ViewState["Seconds"] ?? 0); }
            set { ViewState["Seconds"] = value; }
        }

        [Description("PostBackTimer_OnTimeout")]
        public event EventHandler Timeout = delegate { };

        [Description("PostBackTimer_OnCommand")]
        public event CommandEventHandler Command = delegate { };

        public void RaisePostBackEvent(string eventArgument)
        {
            Timeout(this, EventArgs.Empty);
            Command(this, new CommandEventArgs(CommandName, CommandArgument));
        }

        protected override void OnPreRender(EventArgs e)
        {
            if (Enabled && Seconds > 0)
            {
                var postback = Page.ClientScript.GetPostBackEventReference(this, null);
                var script = string.Format("setTimeout(\"{0}\",{1});", postback, Seconds * 1000);
                Page.ClientScript.RegisterStartupScript(GetType(), "PostBackTimer_" + UniqueID, script, true);
            }

            base.OnPreRender(e);
        }
    }
}
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with javascript, call __doPostBack("clientIdOfSubmitButton", null). This will fire off a postback just as if that button (or any other control you want) had triggered it.

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