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I've an enum like this:

public enum PcapLinkType {
  DLT_NULL(0)
  DLT_EN10MB(1)
  DLT_EN3MB(2),
  DLT_AX25(3),
  /*snip, 200 more enums, not always consecutive.*/
  DLT_UNKNOWN(-1);
    private final int value;   

    PcapLinkType(int value) {
        this.value= value;
    }
}

Now I get an int from external input and want the matching input - throwing an exception if a value does not exist is ok, but preferably I'd have it be DLT_UNKNOWN in that case.

int val = in.readInt();
PcapLinkType type = ???; /*convert val to a PcapLinkType */
share|improve this question
up vote 67 down vote accepted

You would need to do this manually, by adding a a static map in the class that maps Integers to enums, such as

private static final Map<Integer, PcapLinkType> intToTypeMap = new HashMap<Integer, PcapLinkType>();
static {
    for (PcapLinkType type : PcapLinkType.values()) {
        intToTypeMap.put(type.value, type);
    }
}

public static PcapLinkType fromInt(int i) {
    PcapLinkType type = intToTypeMap.get(Integer.valueOf(i));
    if (type == null) 
        return PcapLinkType.DLT_UNKNOWN;
    return type;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
updated with recommendations from dty, which was a good idea. – MeBigFatGuy Mar 13 '11 at 22:20
    
I hope you ran my code through a compiler first... I just made it up off the top of my head. I know the technique works - I used it yesterday. But the code is on another machine and this one doesn't have my dev tools. – dty Mar 13 '11 at 22:23
1  
allOf is only available for sets – MeBigFatGuy Mar 13 '11 at 22:29
1  
Also, EnumMap uses the enums as the keys. In this case, the OP wants the enums as the values. – dty Mar 13 '11 at 22:30
6  
This seems like a lot of unneeded overhead. Those who actually need this type of operation are probably in need of high performance because they are writing/reading from streams/sockets, in which case, the caching of values() (if your enum values are sequential) or a simple switch statement would beat this method handily. If you only have a handful of entries in your Enum then it doesn't make much sense to add the overhead of a HashMap simply for the convenience of not having to update the switch statement. This method may seem more elegant, but it's also wasteful. – crush Aug 6 '13 at 20:19

There's a static method values() which is documented, but not where you'd expect it: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/enum.html

enum MyEnum {
    FIRST, SECOND, THIRD;
    private static MyEnum[] allValues = values();
    public static MyEnum fromOrdinal(int n) {return allValues[n];}
}

In principle, you can use just values()[i], but there are rumors that values() will create a copy of the array each time it is invoked.

share|improve this answer
7  
According to Joshua Bloch (Effective Java Book): Never derive a value associated with an enum from its ordinal; Your implementation shouldn't rely on the enums order. – stevo.mit Sep 11 '13 at 15:08
2  
Implementation of what? If we implement some algorithm, the implementation shouldn't rely on the enums order unless that order is documented. When we implement the enum itself, it is ok to use such implementation details, in the same way as it is ok to use class-private methods. – 18446744073709551615 Sep 12 '13 at 5:14
    
Don't agree. I believe never is meant regardless documentation. You should not use ordinals even when you implement enum yourself. It's a bad smell and it's error prone. I not an expert but I wouldn't argue with Joshua Bloch :) – stevo.mit Sep 12 '13 at 7:14
    
@stevo.mit have a look at the new enum java.time.Month in Java 8. The Month.of(int) static method does exactly what Joshua Bloch said you should "never" do. It returns a Month based on its ordinal. – Klitos Kyriacou Feb 19 '15 at 12:39
1  
@stevo.mit There are ordered enums and unordered enums. (And bitmask enums too.) It is simply incorrect to talk of them as just "enums". The decision of what expressive means to use must be based on the level of abstraction you work on. It is indeed incorrect to use implementation details (expressive means from the lower level) or usage assumptions (expressive means from the higher level). As to "never", in human languages never never means never, because there always is some context. (Usually, in application programming, never...) BTW, programering.com/a/MzNxQjMwATM.html – 18446744073709551615 Feb 20 '15 at 10:26

You will have to make a new static method where you iterate PcapLinkType.values() and compare:

public static PcapLinkType forCode(int code) {
    for (PcapLinkType typе : PcapLinkType.values()) {
        if (type.getValue() == code) {
            return type
        }
    }
    return null
 }

That would be fine if it is called rarely. If it is called frequently, then look at the Map optimization suggested by others.

share|improve this answer
4  
Might be expensive if called a lot. Building a static map is likely to give better amortised cost. – dty Mar 13 '11 at 22:24
    
@dty o(n) with n = 200 - i dont think its an issue – Bozho Mar 13 '11 at 22:48
4  
That's a totally ridiculous statement without a feel for how frequently it's called. If it's called once, fine. If it's called for every packet whizzing past on a 10Ge network then making an algorithm 200x faster is very important. Hence why I qualified my statement with "if called a lot" – dty Mar 14 '11 at 7:46
    
@dty sure (15chrs) – Bozho Mar 14 '11 at 21:35
    
Thanks for nice code, but semicolon is missing after "return null" – user561749 Dec 10 '14 at 13:25

You can do something like this to automatically register them all into a collection with which to then easily convert the integers to the corresponding enum. (BTW, adding them to the map in the enum constructor is not allowed. It's nice to learn new things even after many years of using Java. :)

public enum PcapLinkType {
    DLT_NULL(0),
    DLT_EN10MB(1),
    DLT_EN3MB(2),
    DLT_AX25(3),
    /*snip, 200 more enums, not always consecutive.*/
    DLT_UNKNOWN(-1);

    private static final Map<Integer, PcapLinkType> typesByValue = new HashMap<Integer, PcapLinkType>();

    static {
        for (PcapLinkType type : PcapLinkType.values()) {
            typesByValue.put(type.value, type);
        }
    }

    private final int value;

    private PcapLinkType(int value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static PcapLinkType forValue(int value) {
        return typesByValue.get(value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This was already suggested. In two different forms. – dty Mar 13 '11 at 22:26
1  
That's what you get for double checking your answer before posting. ;) – Esko Luontola Mar 13 '11 at 22:37

if you have enum like this

public enum PcapLinkType {
  DLT_NULL(0)
  DLT_EN10MB(1)
  DLT_EN3MB(2),
  DLT_AX25(3),
  /*snip, 200 more enums, not always consecutive.*/
  DLT_UNKNOWN(-1);
    private final int value;   

    PcapLinkType(int value) {
        this.value= value;
    }
}

then you can use it like

PcapLinkType type = PcapLinkType.values()[1]; /*convert val to a PcapLinkType */
share|improve this answer
    
you missed the comment /*snip, 200 more enums, not always consecutive.*/ – MeBigFatGuy Jul 26 '15 at 15:37

As @MeBigFatGuy says, except you can make your static {...} block use a loop over the values() collection:

static {
    for (PcapLinkType type : PcapLinkType.values()) {
        intToTypeMap.put(type.getValue(), type);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This is what I use:

public enum Quality {ENOUGH,BETTER,BEST;
                     private static final int amount = EnumSet.allOf(Quality.class).size();
                     private static Quality[] val = new Quality[amount];
                     static{ for(Quality q:EnumSet.allOf(Quality.class)){ val[q.ordinal()]=q; } }
                     public static Quality fromInt(int i) { return val[i]; }
                     public Quality next() { return fromInt((ordinal()+1)%amount); }
                    }
share|improve this answer

You could add a static method in your enum that accepts an int as a parameter and returns a PcapLinkType.

public static PcapLinkType of(int linkType) {

    switch (linkType) {
        case -1: return DLT_UNKNOWN
        case 0: return DLT_NULL;

        //ETC....

        default: return null;

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Better not forget to add an entry to that switch statement if you add a new enum. Not ideal, IMHO. – dty Mar 13 '11 at 22:26
    
If your enums changes over time, then yes..... – Buhake Sindi Mar 13 '11 at 22:35
1  
@dty So, you think the overhead of a HashMap outweighs the need to add a new case to a switch statement? – crush Aug 6 '13 at 19:44
1  
I think I'd rather write code that helps me not make mistakes and is therefore more likely to be correct before I focus on the micro-performance of a hash lookup. – dty Aug 6 '13 at 20:59
static final PcapLinkType[] values  = { DLT_NULL, DLT_EN10MB, DLT_EN3MB, null ...}

...

public static PcapLinkType  getPcapLinkTypeForInt(int num){
    try{
       return values[int];
    }catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e){
       return DLT_UKNOWN;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Expensive if called a lot. Need to remember to update the array (why do you even have it when enums define a .values() method?). – dty Mar 13 '11 at 22:25
    
@dty is it the try/catch? I think it would be fairer to say its expensive if a lot of the values fall in the DLT_UNKNOWN category. – nsfyn55 Mar 14 '11 at 14:16
    
Sorry, I misread it. It's not expensive at all. – dty Mar 14 '11 at 16:43
1  
I am really surprised to see an array solution voted down and a map solution voted up. What I do dislike here is --int, but it's obviously a typo. – 18446744073709551615 Apr 10 '12 at 7:46
1  
Why not static final values[] = PcapLinkType.values() ? – 18446744073709551615 Jul 2 '12 at 9:59

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