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Ultimately my goal is to be able to save an array of records data structure in a sqlite BLOB field, but in the interim I am trying to serialize an array of records and store it in a TMemoryStream. In case it may be relevant, I am using Tim Anderson's sqlite wrapper (unicode) with Delphi 2010.

This is my array of record declaration:

type
  TPerson = array of packed record
    sCountry: string[50];
    sFullName: string[100];
    sAddress: string[100];
    sCity: string[30];
    sEmployer: string[100];
  end;

var
  MyPeople       : TPerson;

And here is the code I am currently using to serialize this array of record to a TMemoryStream. The problem is that it doesn't work:

var
  i : integer;
  ms : TMemoryStream:
  ms2 : TMemoryStream;    
  TestPeople : TPerson;
  sldb              : TSQLiteDatabase;
begin
    ms := TMemoryStream.Create;
    ms2 := TMemoryStream.Create;
    sldb := TSQLiteDatabase.Create(slDBPath); //sldBPath is a global variable with path to sqlite db
    try
        i := Length(MyPeople);
        ms.Write(i, 4);
        ms.Write(pointer(MyPeople)^, i * sizeOf(MyPeople));
        ///
        ms2.Read(i, 4);  
        SetLength(ms2, i);
        ms2.Read(pointer(TestPeople)^, i * sizeOf(TestPeople));

        WriteLn('#############' + ms2[0].sFullName); //check if we can read data back

        sQuery := 'UPDATE PersonDirectory SET fldPersonBlob = ? WHERE id = "' + 42 + '";';
        sldb.UpdateBlob(sQuery, ms);

    finally
      ms.Free;
      ms2.Free;
      sqldb.Free;
    end;
end;

Any ideas on either how to generally serialize an array of record to a TMemoryStream, or a better way to store an array of records in a sqlite BLOB field?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make TPerson the packed record, and declare TPersons as array of TPerson.

type
  TPerson = packed record
    sCountry: string[50];
    sFullName: string[100];
    sAddress: string[100];
    sCity: string[30];
    sEmployer: string[100];
  end;
  TPersons = array of TPerson;
var
  MyPeople: TPersons;

This allows you to get SizeOf(TPerson) to get the right size of the record, while Length(MyPeople) will give you the length of the array. Multiply them to get the total byte size. That should get you started.

Also note that some read and write action start from the beginning of the stream, while others continue at the current position. Setting position to 0 before copying the contents of a stream to another is sometimes needed. The documentation will mention this.

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Size of an element still can be found out: SizeOf(MyPeople[0]). –  Sertac Akyuz Mar 14 '11 at 0:57
1  
Yeah, you're right about that, but the code feels cleaner if you split up the types like this. Better naming too, since TPersons can contain more than one person. :) –  GolezTrol Mar 14 '11 at 1:17
1  
Agreed, especially the naming! –  Sertac Akyuz Mar 14 '11 at 1:44

Maybe I wrong, but you are writing in ms and reading from ms2.

ms2 is a memory stream, but don't point to same memory content that ms is pointing. I think that ms2 will not read content from ms if you don't change your code.

If you need to put the content of ms into ms2, try

ms2.LoadFromStream(ms);

before you start to reading content.

Of course, you need to know the size of a individual record to do the right math.

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I think Mick has not posted all his code, probably there is code doing that in the /// part. –  Sertac Akyuz Mar 14 '11 at 1:50
    
Also note that, if you're right, you need to set ms.Position := 0 before doing the call to ms2.LoadFromStream. If Mick did post the entire code (and Sertac is wrong), you made a nice catch. :) –  Ken White Mar 14 '11 at 2:00

You can use an array of records with plain string, then save them into a stream with our TDynArray wrapper.

It will use less space than shortstrings, because it will write only the characters used by the string. For instance, sEmployer defined as string[100] will always use 101 bytes when stored directly. Whereas with our TDynArray, it will only use the number of chars plus one.

Works from Delphi 6 up to XE.

type
  TPerson = packed record
    sCountry: string;
    sFullName: string;
    sAddress: string;
    sCity: string;
    sEmployer: string;
  end;
  TPersons = array of TPerson;

var
  MyPeople: TPersons;

(...)
procedure SavePeopleToStream(Stream: TMemoryStream);
begin
  DynArray(TypeInfo(TPersons),MyPeople).SaveToStream(Stream);
end;

You've got the reverse LoadFromStream method available, and much more, in TDynArray. See this blog entry to get this wrapper.

Additional note: It's funny, this is the same exact feature I'm about to add to our ORM: store dynamic array content in a BLOB field, encoded as binary. But in our case, all will be automated thanks to the Delphi RTTI. And there is also a Client/Server layer, using JSON for transmission, to make this more n-Tier compliant.

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1  
That's it: I've added dynamic arrays as valid published properties in our framework. And also TPersistent, TStrings and TCollection. Dynamic arrays are stored in BLOB, where as TPersistent, TStrings and TCollection are stored in TEXT fields, JSON encoded (as JSON arrays and/or objects). –  Arnaud Bouchez Apr 27 '11 at 5:50

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