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Here's the deal: I need to extend specifica instances of the class Box with some methods. The methods i need to include live inside modules and i want the Box instance to be able to include the modules dynamically. Now i am using a hook with an eval:

class Box
  def after_initialize
    if self.injected_module.present?
      eval("class << self; include #{self.injected_module}; end")
    end
  end
end

It is working quite well but i really feel dirty when i use eval. I'm looking for something like that:

module_to_inject = self.injected_module
self.eigenclass.class_eval do
   include module_to_inject
end

but i'm not being able to get the eigenclass to run class_eval on without monkeypatching the class like:

class Box; def eigenclass; class << self; self; end end end

Is there a beautiful (and reliable) way for me to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

All you need to add methods from modules to specific instances of Box dynamically is the Kernel#extend method:

box.extend MyModule

Also, because the verb "to inject" already has a meaning in Ruby from Enumerable#inject, the best verb for describing this is "to extend".

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Thanks a lot! It worked like a charm! –  Lucas d. Prim Mar 14 '11 at 12:53

I can't follow your reasoning there. self.class.class_eval will work just fine in your example, like so:

class Box
  def after_initialize
    self.class.class_eval do
      include(self.injected_module)
    end
  end
end

Edit: clarifying the comments.

Use Object#extend to include methods in a Module as class methods (like defining them in the eigenclass would), like so:

module MyModule
    def method
        puts "called from #{self.inspect}"
    end
end

class Box
    def self.injected_module
        MyModule
    end

    def require_module
        self.class.class_eval do
            extend self.injected_module
        end
    end
end

b = Box.new
b.require_module
Box.method
# prints "called from Box"
share|improve this answer
    
the problem with this solution is that it adds a methods into the class itself, not into the eigenclass. This way if i create another Box instance after executing this code, the instance will get the new method. I'm looking to include the methods as singleton methods to the instance i am creating! –  Lucas d. Prim Mar 14 '11 at 2:42
    
I can't follow that reasoning either. You seem to have the concept of "eigenclass" confused. "eigenclass" is synonym for the class, methods called directly on the class, like Box.method. Here, however, you're including a Module into a class, defining instance methods. Can you try to clarify what exactly you want? –  fx_ Mar 14 '11 at 3:12
    
My best guess is that you're returning a singleton instance and want methods from a Module added as class methods, so you can call Box.method instead of calling the method on the instance, like Box.instance.method. You should use Object#extend then instead of include. –  fx_ Mar 14 '11 at 3:18
    
As far as I know, eigenclass is not a synonym for the class link - let me put this straight: i have an instance of Box, lets call it boxie. I want to add methods to boxie (instance, that can have methods of its own through its eigenclass), not to Box(class). The methods i want to add are inside a module M but i can't include them into the instance without using eval because i can't include the "instance methods" directly into the eigenclass dynamically. –  Lucas d. Prim Mar 14 '11 at 3:44
    
eigenclass is singleton class in ruby terminology. The class << self idiom makes self the context in which to define methods, so you're defining class methods rather than instance methods. Read this question for more detail. What you linked is the method lookup tree of ruby. You simply need to answer for yourself: do you want the methods in your Module to be instance methods (for boxie) or class methods (for Box) - use include for the first and extend for the latter. –  fx_ Mar 14 '11 at 16:36

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