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I have a main() function and prior to declaring main(), I declare global variables.

Then inside main() 2 processes start: 1 child and 1 parent via fork(). Why can't the parent and child processes share the global variables I declared? What is a good way to handle this? Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you fork() you're spawning a new process. Everything at the time of the fork is copied, but after that ... nothing is shared.

You have two choices at that point:

  • Keep a pipe open between your two processes and communicate changes
  • Re-write your code to be multi-threaded, where you can access the same data (using locks)
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Thanks. So the only good way to share data between them would be via a common file? –  user629034 Mar 14 '11 at 6:11
    
No, there's plenty of other options, shared memory, pipes, etc. –  paxdiablo Mar 14 '11 at 6:12
    
There's actually another way that involves shared memory, but that's really overkill in most cases (and complicated). A file may be sufficient depending on what you're trying to do, but you will want to look at flock() to make sure you're not writing to the file at the same time. –  Brian Roach Mar 14 '11 at 6:14
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@user629034 - A pipe is like a file that isn't written to the disk. One process keeps the read end of the pipe and reads from it, and the other keeps the write end and writes to it, allowing them to communicate through a "file" without the speedbump of disk IO. –  Chris Lutz Mar 14 '11 at 6:14
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@paxdiablo - I said pipe :) You could use middleware too, but that's prob beyond the scope of this. –  Brian Roach Mar 14 '11 at 6:14

With fork() you create a new process with separate memory space. To communicate between processes you can use signals (using kill())

If you want to share variables, consider using threads (e.g. pthread.h). Then you can use events or mutexes for thread synchronization.

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