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I have a device function that is defined in a header file. The reason it is in a header file is because it is used by a global kernel, which needs to be in a header file since it is a template kernel.

When this header file is included across 2 or more .cu files, I get a LNK2005 error during linking:

FooDevice.cu.obj : error LNK2005: "int __cdecl getCurThreadIdx(void)" (?getCurThreadIdx@@YAHXZ) already defined in Main.cu.obj

Why is this error caused? How to fix it?

Here is sample code to produces the above error:

FooDevice.h:

#ifndef FOO_DEVICE_H
#define FOO_DEVICE_H

__device__ int getCurThreadIdx()
{
    return ( ( blockIdx.x * blockDim.x ) + threadIdx.x );
}

template< typename T >
__global__ void fooKernel( const T* inArr, int num, T* outArr )
{
    const int threadNum = ( gridDim.x * blockDim.x );

    for ( int idx = getCurThreadIdx(); idx < num; idx += threadNum )
        outArr[ idx ] = inArr[ idx ];

    return;
}

__global__ void fooKernel2( const int* inArr, int num, int* outArr );

#endif // FOO_DEVICE_H

FooDevice.cu:

#include "FooDevice.h"

// One other kernel that uses getCurThreadIdx()
__global__ void fooKernel2( const int* inArr, int num, int* outArr )
{
    const int threadNum = ( gridDim.x * blockDim.x );

    for ( int idx = getCurThreadIdx(); idx < num; idx += threadNum )
        outArr[ idx ] = inArr[ idx ];

    return;
}

Main.cu:

#include "FooDevice.h"

int main()
{
    int num             = 10;
    int* dInArr         = NULL;
    int* dOutArr        = NULL;
    const int arrSize   = num * sizeof( *dInArr );

    cudaMalloc( &dInArr, arrSize );
    cudaMalloc( &dOutArr, arrSize );

    // Using template kernel
    fooKernel<<< 10, 10 >>>( dInArr, num, dOutArr );

    return 0;
}
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2 Answers 2

Why is this error caused?

Because you have included your header in FooDevice.cu and Main.cu where it gets defined so you now have two copies of the same function and the linker detects this.

How to fix it?

If you have the following defined in foo.h

template<typename T> __device__ T foo(T x)
{
    return x;
}

And two .cu files that both include foo.h and also contain a call to it, e.g.

int x = foo<int>(1);

Then you can force foo() inline:

template<typename T>
inline __device__ T foo(T x)
{
    return x;
}

and call:

int x = foo<int>(1);

This will stop it from being declared multiple times.

Function templates are an exempt of One Defintion Rule and may be more than one definition of them in different translation unit's. Full function template specialization is not a template, rather an ordinary function, so you need to use inline keyword not to violate ODR if you want to put them in a header file included into several translation unit's.

Taken from http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t447911-why-does-explicit-specialization-of-function-templates-cause-generation-of-code.html

See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Definition_Rule

I changed your code like this:

inline __device__ int getCurThreadIdx()
{
    return ( ( blockIdx.x * blockDim.x ) + threadIdx.x );
}

template< typename T >
__global__ void fooKernel( const T* inArr, int num, T* outArr )
{
    const int threadNum = ( gridDim.x * blockDim.x );

    for ( int idx = getCurThreadIdx(); idx < num; idx += threadNum )
        outArr[ idx ] = inArr[ idx ];

    return;
}

And it now compiles. Your declaration without the inline of getCurThreadIdx() was violating the one definition rule.

share|improve this answer
    
Ade Miller: I know how function definition work with C/C++ code. Why is a CUDA device function having multiple definitions? Isn't it gobbled up and inlined into the kernels? Any solution you can suggest for this situation? –  Ashwin Mar 14 '11 at 7:03
    
Ade Miller: I have updated my question with sample code that produces this error. Could you modify the code in your answer to fit my question code? Thanks! –  Ashwin Mar 14 '11 at 7:33
    
Ade Miller: inline solves this problem! A few more Qs: Isn't a simple device function like this inlined by CUDA compiler anyway? Also, why are you using the C/C++ inline instead of the CUDA forceinline? –  Ashwin Mar 14 '11 at 7:51
1  
__forceinline or __inline also compile correctly. As to your other question I'm not entirely sure. It's something to do with the way the fooKernel<> template gets expanded I suspect but I don't have the inclination to investigate further. You could try turning on intermediate compiler output and seeing what gets generated. Either way I think you've got your answer. –  Ade Miller Mar 14 '11 at 8:09
1  
Yes but the templated function is __global so it gets exposed to both host and device code. My assumption is that this is part of the issue. –  Ade Miller Mar 14 '11 at 16:19

It should be inlined. You could try adding the inline keyword.

Maybe you could remove the unnecessary code and create a simple text example for us to see? Usually the problem lies in the details...

share|improve this answer
    
CygnusX1: I have added sample code to the question above. Both inline or forceinline qualifiers seem to work. But, why do they work? And why do both solve this problem? One is C/C++ qualifier and other is CUDA qualifier! –  Ashwin Mar 14 '11 at 7:32
1  
CUDA supports both __inline and __forceinline (look in host_defines.h). They work because the inline the getCurThreadIdx() into the calling method so getCurThreadIdx() isn't defined every time the header is included, breaking the ODR. –  Ade Miller Mar 14 '11 at 7:50

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