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Please help me with the above question. An algorithm with a working example will be appreciated. Also, please handle the case when the above is not possible.

Okay, what I have till now is the following:

Go through entire array and get average of whole array. O(n). Let us call this avg

Then from this average can get the average of the whole array except a[0] (the formula is: avg(a[1..n-1])=(avg(a[0..n-1])*n-a[0])/(n-1)). Then you take this new average and compare it with a[0]. If they are not equal you move to the next value calculating the averages from the previously know averages using the formula from above.

Though someone has provided me a solution that "works", I am looking for the most efficient implementation.

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11  
Please post the code you have written so far. People generally do not like to just write your code for you. As it is, this is a work description, not a question. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 14 '11 at 7:31
1  
@Mitch: I have given you my answer. Can you give your's now? –  Programmer Mar 14 '11 at 8:25
    
The solution you propose is O(n) overall, and I do not think it can be made any more efficient than that, simply because you will have to look at each element of the array once. –  Björn Pollex Mar 14 '11 at 8:57
    
Isn't this a Partition problem? A number from the original list can be in list1 or not (in that case its in list2) –  Satadru Biswas Mar 16 '11 at 18:09
    
do you have to separate the array into left / right, or can you re-arrange freely the elements? For instance, if your array is [1;1;2;2], is [1;2], [1;2] valid, or is it considered unfeasible? –  Mathias Jul 1 '12 at 7:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A quick google search returned this. In any case, if you're not looking for performance, backtracking is always an option

EDIT: I tried to apply backtracking. My solution is in no way efficient. You can, of course, replace the average methods to avoid another level of cycling. Also, in order to show that there is no solution, you can just count the number the solutions.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;

public class SOQuestion {

    /**
     * just prints a solution
     * 
     * @param list
     * @param indexes
     */
    public static void printSolution(List list, HashSet indexes) {
        Iterator iter = indexes.iterator();
        while (iter.hasNext()) {
            System.out.print(list.get((Integer) iter.next()) + " ");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }

    /**
     * calculates the average of a list, but only taking into account the values
     * of at the given indexes
     * 
     * @param list
     * @param indexes
     * @return
     */
    public static float avg(List list, HashSet indexes) {
        Iterator iter = indexes.iterator();
        float sum = 0;
        while (iter.hasNext()) {
            sum += (Integer) list.get((Integer) iter.next());
        }
        return sum / indexes.size();
    }

    /**
     * calculates the average of a list, ignoring the values of at the given
     * indexes
     * 
     * @param list
     * @param indexes
     * @return
     */
    public static float avg_e(List list, HashSet indexes) {
        float sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
            if (!indexes.contains(i)) {
                sum += (Integer) list.get(i);
            }
        }
        return sum / (list.size() - indexes.size());
    }

    public static void backtrack(List list, int start, HashSet indexes) {
        for (int i = start; i < list.size(); i++) {
            indexes.add(i);
            if (avg(list, indexes) == avg_e(list, indexes)) {
                System.out.println("Solution found!");
                printSolution(list, indexes);
            }
            backtrack(list, i + 1, indexes);
            indexes.remove(i);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List test = new ArrayList();
        test.add(2);
        test.add(1);
        test.add(3);

        backtrack(test, 0, new HashSet());
    }
}
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I checked those.They are not accurate. Most of them are not correct –  Programmer Mar 14 '11 at 7:40
3  
@drstupid: A good answer should be self-contained and complete (if possible). If you just have a link that you googled, make it a comment. Same for a single catchword (backtracking). To make this an answer, explain how to solve the problem, and post these links as references. –  Björn Pollex Mar 14 '11 at 7:47
    
@stupid: I agree. Please be specific –  Programmer Mar 14 '11 at 7:53
    
@Space_C0wb0y giving me some time to develop the answer would have been nice. But thanks for the tip, anyway. I also thought giving quick pointers before giving the full solution would be helpful for the asker. My bad –  drstupid Mar 14 '11 at 7:53
5  
@Programmer I think I gave you enough of pointers on how to improve the solution. If you're looking for someone to do your work for you, SO is not the right place. –  drstupid Mar 14 '11 at 8:57

Here is how i did it:
1 - Total array --> if odd number then can't create two separate arrays. O(n)
2 - Divide total by 2.
3 - Sort Array (highest to lowest) --> O(NLogN)
4 - Start with the highest number and keep trying to get the remaining amount by going to the next highest number. If you can't do it then move the number to the other array. --> I think the worst case is O(N^2).

So lets take this example: 3, 19, 7, 4, 6, 40, 25, 8

  1. Total = 112
  2. Divide by 2 = 56
  3. Sort Array - 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 19, 25, 40
  4. --> 40 in list 1 (list 1 total = 40, 16 remaining)
    --> 25 too big, in list 2 (list 2 total = 25)
    --> 19 too big, in list 2 (list 2 total = 44)
    --> testing 8 in list 1 (list 1 total = 48, 8 remaining)
    --> Testing 7 in list 1 (list 1 total = 55, 1 remaining)
    --> no way to add 1 more
    --> 7 fails test 6 (list 1 total = 54, 2 remaining)
    --> no way to add 2 more
    --> 6 fails test 4 (list 2 total - 52, 4 remaining)
    --> no way to add 2 more
    --> 4 fails test 3
    --> 3 fails go back to 8
    --> Move 8 to list 2 and start testing 7 (list 1 total = 47, 9 remaining, list 2 total=52)
    --> Testing 6 (list 1 total = 53, 3 remaining)
    --> Add 3 element (List 1 total = 56, success)

So the two list are [40,7,6,3] and [25,19,8,4]

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Why can't you create 2 arrays if the total array has an odd length? It's not stated that the resulting arrays should have the same length. The averages have to be the same, and this can be done for [2,3,4,5,6] -> [2,4,6] + [3,5] –  drstupid Mar 16 '11 at 7:40
    
drstupid is correct. Please refine your solution –  Programmer Mar 16 '11 at 10:05

I think if the SUM of all the elements in original array is odd, then division into 2 arrays is not possible. how ever if sum == even, you can starting making your array such that sum of elements in each == SUM/2

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#include<stdio.h>

void partitionEqualAvt(int *a, int n)
{

    int i;
    int sum=0, sSum=0, eSum, sAvg, eAvg;
    for(i=0; i<n; i++)
        sum+=a[i];
    eSum=sum;
    for(i=0; i<n-1; i++)
    {
        sAvg=0;
        eAvg=0;
        sSum+=a[i];
        eSum=sum-sSum;
        sAvg=sSum/(i+1);
        eAvg=eSum/(n-i-1);
        if(sAvg == eAvg)
        {
            printf("\nAverage = %d from [%d to %d] and [%d to %d]", sAvg, 0, i, i+1, n);
        }
    }
}

int main()
{

    int a[]={1,1,1,1,1,1};
    int n=sizeof(a)/sizeof(int);
    partitionEqualAvt(a,n);
    return 0;
}
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1  
We can adjust it to include float averages. –  Sunil Yaduvanshi Jul 1 '12 at 6:36

Try this code...

#include <QList>
#include <QDebug>

/****

We sort the array in the desending order. So the first two elemnts
are the biggest element of the array. These are put in split1 and the
split2 array. Note that we start from the biggest element the average
is going to be much higher than the final avarage. Next we start placing
the smaller elemnts from source to split1 or split2. To do this we make a
simple dicision. We look at the value to be added and then see if that will
increase/decrease the average of a given split. Accordingly we make our
decesion.

****/


static bool averageSplit(const QList<int>& source,
                         QList<int>& split1,
                         QList<int>& split2)
{
    if (source.size() < 2) {
        return false;
    }

    QList<int> list = source;
    qSort(list.begin(), list.end(), qGreater<int>());

    double sum = 0;
    foreach(int elm, list) {
        sum += elm;
    }
    const double totalAvg = sum / list.size();

    double sum1 = list[0];
    double sum2 = list[1];
    split1.append(list[0]);
    split2.append(list[1]);
    for(int i = list.size() - 1; i >= 2; --i) {
        double avg1 = sum1 / split1.size();
        double avg2 = sum2 / split2.size();
        int val = list[i];
        if (avg1 < avg2) {
            // Try to increase tha avg1 or decrease avg2.
            if (val > split1.size()) {
                split1.append(val);
                sum1 += val;
            }
            else {
                split2.append(val);
                sum2 += val;
            }
        }
        else {
            // Try to increase tha avg2 or decrease avg1.
            if (val > split2.size()) {
                split2.append(val);
                sum2 += val;
            }
            else {
                split1.append(val);
                sum1 += val;
            }
        }
    }

    qDebug() << "totalAvg " << totalAvg;
    qDebug() << "Avg1 " << sum1 / split1.size();
    qDebug() << "Avg2 " << sum2 / split2.size();
}

void testAverageSplit()
{
    QList<int> list;

    list << 100 << 20 << 13 << 12 << 12 << 10 << 9 << 8 << 6 << 3 << 2 << 0;
    list << -1 << -1 << -4 << -100;

    QList<int> split1;
    QList<int> split2;
    averageSplit(list, split1, split2);

    qDebug() << "split1" << split1;
    qDebug() << "split2" << split2;
}
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Using Greedy algorithm One approach to the problem, imitating the way children choose teams for a game, is the greedy algorithm, which iterates through the numbers in descending order, assigning each of them to whichever subset has the smaller sum. This works well when the numbers in the set are of about the same size as its cardinality or less.

Try this in python: If the average exists then this may find it, otherwise it will get you close to equal average.

    a = [500, 1, -45, 46, -20, 100, -30, 4, 110]

    b, c = [], []

    m1, m2, n1, n2 = 0, 0, 0, 0
    count = 0
    for i in a:
        if count == 0:
            b.append(i)
            n1 += 1
            m1 = i
            n1 = 1
            count = 1
            continue
        else:
            tmp_m1 = (m1 * n1 + i) / (n1 + 1)
            tmp_m2 = (m2 * n2 + i) / (n2 + 1)
            print b, c, tmp_m1, tmp_m2
            if m1 > m2:
                if(tmp_m1 - m2 < m1 - tmp_m2):
                    b.append(i)
                    m1 = tmp_m1
                    n1 += 1
                else:
                    c.append(i)
                    m2 = tmp_m2
                    n2 += 1
            else:
                if(tmp_m1 - m2 < m1 - tmp_m2):
                    c.append(i)
                    m2 = tmp_m2
                    n2 += 1
                else:
                    c.append(i)
                    m1 = tmp_m1
                    n1 += 1
    print b, c, m1, m2

Sample output:
[500] [] 250 1
[500, 1] [] 151 -45
[500, 1, -45] [] 124 46
[500, 1, -45] [46] 108 13
[500, 1, -45, -20] [46] 106 73
[500, 1, -45, -20] [46, 100] 80 38
[500, 1, -45, -20, -30] [46, 100] 67 50
[500, 1, -45, -20, -30, 4] [46, 100] 73 85
[500, 1, -45, -20, -30, 4] [46, 100, 110] 73 73
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