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How I can get rownum in oracle over order by name? i.e In SQL I have a query

  SELECT 
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY FIRSTNAME) SRL

  FROM   
    [SECURITY].[USERS]

  ORDER BY 
    FIRSTNAME

How will it be in Oracle?

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4  
Remove the non-standard square brackets and the syntax is fine for Oracle (and a lot of other standard compliant DBMS) –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 14 '11 at 7:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY FIRSTNAME)SRL FROM USERS
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You don't need the PARTITION BY 1, right? –  Thilo Mar 14 '11 at 8:04
    
Yes, PARTITION BY is optional. –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 14 '11 at 10:54

In Oracle, ROWNUM refers to the current record in the result set (which should be ordered).

SELECT ROWNUM AS SRL
FROM USERS
ORDER BY FIRSTNAME

EDIT: THIS IS WRONG. ROWNUM is assigned BEFORE ordering.

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Yes, but ROW_NUMBER is something else –  Thilo Mar 14 '11 at 8:01
    
True. It is a window function. However, a window function is not much use if you are not partitioning the result set, and having a window function with one partition is pretty similar to just using ROWNUM, I believe. ROWNUM is for Oracle, I am not sure what the equivalent for SQL Server is. –  Stephen Chung Mar 14 '11 at 8:06
4  
Incorrect. ROWNUM is a pseudocolumn that resolves to 1 for the first row returned, 2 for the next, and so on - but it is assigned before any ordering is applied. –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 14 '11 at 10:53
    
@Jeffrey Kemp, Oops! You are absolutely correct. Despicable me. ROWNUM is assigned before ordering, as you commented. +1. –  Stephen Chung Mar 14 '11 at 10:55
    
Of course, you can wrap the query as a subquery, then order by the rownum, e.g. select * from (select x, ROWNUM r from t) order by r; –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 14 '11 at 11:02

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