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How to Disable the Send and End keys on Motorola MC75 ?

i need any C# sample code for this

thanks in advance

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Can you specify why do you need it? It would help guiding the answer. –  Assaf Levy Mar 14 '11 at 16:59
    
i need to disable the [end] phone call button in Motorola MC75 –  Gali Mar 14 '11 at 18:57
    
Well, it seems that the soft keys layout has changed greatly in 6.5. The best I can do is point you in the direction of registry keys: [HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Shell] and [HKLM\Software\Microsoft\CHome\] and use trial and error to get it working. Perhaps there's a better solution out there. –  Assaf Levy Mar 15 '11 at 10:21

3 Answers 3

I answered this on the MSDN forums.

You can use the AllKeys API to do this.

The P/Invoke signature for using it in C# is here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mikefrancis/archive/2009/03/28/porting-gapi-keys-to-wm-6-1-and-6-5.aspx

A good general explanation of its usage is here: http://windowsteamblog.com/windows_phone/b/windowsphone/archive/2009/07/14/just-say-no-to-gapi-what-you-need-to-know-about-allkeys-and-input-management.aspx

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dale b.'s comment: "Unfortunately, the AllKeys solution does not give the application total control either. Applications are not able to receive function keys F1 and F2 using AllKeys." –  Peter O. Feb 15 '12 at 0:19

Use Motorola AppCenter to restrict running applications. It allows you to block keys, programs, etc.

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Edit: I didn't know about the "AllKeys" solution posted by PaulH before, that should be a better solution than the one i posted.

Im assuming that you want to handle the green and red hardware keys? The call and hangup keys?

If that is the case you can monitor the keyevents and choose to not pass them on to windows if they match your criteria.

private const int WH_KEYBOARD_LL = 20;
private static int _hookHandle;
private HookProc _hookDelegate;

[DllImport("coredll.dll")]
private static extern int SetWindowsHookEx(int type, HookProc hookProc, IntPtr       hInstance, int m);

[DllImport("coredll.dll")]
private static extern IntPtr GetModuleHandle(string mod);

[DllImport("coredll.dll", SetLastError = true)]
private static extern int UnhookWindowsHookEx(int idHook);

[DllImport("coredll.dll")]
private static extern int CallNextHookEx(HookProc hhk, int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);


private bool HookKeyboardEvent(bool action)
{
try
{
    if (action)
    {
        HookKeyboardEvent(false);

        _hookDelegate = new HookProc(HookProcedure);
        _hookHandle = SetWindowsHookEx(WH_KEYBOARD_LL, _hookDelegate, GetModuleHandle(null), 0);

        if (_hookHandle == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
    if (_hookHandle != 0)
    {
        //Unhook the previouse one
        UnhookWindowsHookEx(_hookHandle);
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    string dump = ex.Message;
    return false;
}
}

private int HookProcedure(int code, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
{
try
{
    var hookStruct = (KBDLLHOOKSTRUCT) Marshal.PtrToStructure(lParam, typeof (KBDLLHOOKSTRUCT));
    if (DoHardwareKeyPress(hookStruct.vkCode, hookStruct.scanCode, wParam.ToInt32()))
        return CallNextHookEx(_hookDelegate, code, wParam, lParam);
    else
        return -1;
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    string dump = ex.Message;
    return -1;
}
}

private bool DoHardwareKeyPress(int softKey, int hardKey, int keyState)
{
try
{
    string keyPressInformation = string.Format("SoftKey = {0}, HardKey = {1}, KeyState = {2}", softKey, hardKey,
                                               keyState);
    if (softKey == 114 && hardKey == 4 && (keyState == 256 || keyState == 257))
        return false;
    else if (softKey == 115 && hardKey == 12 && (keyState == 256 || keyState == 257))
        return false;
    else
        return true;
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    string dump = ex.Message;
    return true;
}
}

#region Nested type: HookProc

internal delegate int HookProc(int code, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

#endregion

#region Nested type: KBDLLHOOKSTRUCT

private struct KBDLLHOOKSTRUCT
{
public IntPtr dwExtraInfo;
public int flags;
public int scanCode;
public int time;
public int vkCode;
}

#endregion

This is a quick and dirty solution that you might wanna clean up before use :) Just call HookKeyboardEvent(true) to enable the hook and HookKeyboardEvent(false) to unhook.

I hope it solves your problem.

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2  
Keyboard hooks don't allow you to stop a keyboard message from being passed or to modify the keyboard message. They can only be used to alert you of a key press. Not passing them on only prevents other keyboard hooks in the system from receiving the message. This is a Bad Idea and can cause other applications to crash. –  PaulH Mar 16 '11 at 15:42
    
I am using keyboard hooks for a lot of different stuff: NULL them, replace with others and more (see my web site). Where do you get this information from? BTW: on WM only one hook is allowed. –  josef Dec 21 '13 at 5:57

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