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Right now I use the following code to create a uniform distribution of integers with a range. (I took out the seeding code)

int random(int min, int max)
{
    static std::mt19937 gen;
    std::uniform_int<int> dist(min, max);
    return dist(gen);

}

I am trying to modify it to give a distribution that favors twords the min value, and almost never produces nears the max value. I can see all of the pre-made distributions, but none of them are integer. And also I can't tell which one fits my needs based on any of the documentation. The closest I have come is the chi squared distribution as shown on wikipedia, where k=2

But I can't figure out, based on the documentation how to use it with integers, let alone set the k value.

How can I set up my function to use an appropriate non-uniform, integer distribution?


still working on choosing the correct distro: here are the results of std::poisson_distribution<int> dist((max - min) * .1); from 0 to 20:

not quite there yet, as 0 should be more frequent than 1, but it should help the next person out, will post more results as they come.


well my final solution became a combination of methods:

int randomDist(int min, int max)
{
    static std::mt19937 gen;
    std::chi_squared_distribution<double> dist(2);

    int x;
    do
    {
    x = (int)(max*dist(gen)/10) + min;
    }
    while (x > max);
    return x;
}

giving the result of:

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In a Poisson distribution 0 will be more frequent than 1 if you choose a parameter less than 1 (it's currently (20−0)*.1 = 2). You'll also get that with a geometric distribution with any parameter. The one you should pick depends on what you're modelling: geometric models the time until an event occurs (e.g., the number of shots needed to score a goal), Poisson models the number event occurrences in an interval of time (e.g., number of goals in a game). –  aaz Mar 14 '11 at 12:33
1  
Well I am using it for a real time genetic algorithm. Instead of having distinct generation, When the time comes to breed one new organism, I sort them by fitness an choose the parents based one this curve. –  Zak Mar 14 '11 at 21:54
    
@Zak – If you select using the geometric distribution, you could then describe the selection of each parent as a tournament of #1 vs (winner of #2 vs (winner of #3 vs ...)), where #i wins against any #j, i < j, with probability p — sounds quite plausible. –  aaz Mar 14 '11 at 22:41
1  
@Zak: your graph still seems to me a negative exponential distribution; I'd go directly with it. –  Matteo Italia Mar 15 '11 at 0:01
1  
@Matteo & @Zak – Yep, chi_square_distribution(2) is a special case that is identical to exponential_distribution(.5). Furthermore, max*exponential_distribution(.5)/10 is the same as exponential_distrubtion(max*.5/10), and floor(exponential_distribution(max*.5/10)) is the same as geometric_distribution(1-exp(-max*.5/10)). –  aaz Mar 15 '11 at 0:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There are other integer distributions there, they just don't have int in their names. They do have typedef IntType result_type in their class definitions.

The ones which behave as you describe are:

  • binomial_distribution(t, p)

    This generates numbers in the range 0 ≤ xt, so you need to translate the range by min. The mean is at t·p, so choose a p near 0.

    std::binomial_distribution<int> dist(max - min, .1);
    return dist(gen) + min;

  • poisson_distribution(λ)

    This generates numbers 0 ≤ x < ∞, but large numbers are progressively less likely. You can censor anything above max to limit it to a range. The parameter λ is the mean. Choosing it to match the previous example:

    std::poisson_distribution<int> dist((max - min) * .1);
    int x;
    do
        x = dist(gen) + min;
    while (x > max);
    return x;

  • geometric_distribution(p)

    Also generates numbers 0 ≤ x < ∞, but 0 is the most likely outcome and every subsequent number is less likely than the previous. Again choosing the parameter to match the mean of the previous example:

    std::geometric_distribution<int> dist(1 / ((max - min) * .1 + 1));
    int x;
    do
        x = dist(gen) + min;
    while (x > max);
    return x;

You can also use any of the continuous distributions to generate a double and then round it to an int.

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In addition to the distributions said in @aaz's great answer, keep in mind that you can also transform your uniform distribution to any probability distribution function you may think of, using inverse transform sampling (that however is actually feasible only for some "nice" functions) or rejection sampling (can be applied in any case, but can be computationally expensive).

It seems to me that a distribution that would fit your needs would be the (negative) exponential distribution:

Exponential distribution

Luckily, it is one of the distributions to which you can apply inverse transform sampling, which means that, having a sample from a uniform [0, 1] distribution, you can get an exponential distribution by applying the formula:

x = - ln(1-p)/lambda

with p is a random value from the uniform distribution and lambda is the parameter of the exponential distribution; see here for more info.

Once you get x (which will be a double), just cast it to int (or round it with a function like:

int round(double val)
{
    // warning: can give counterintuitive results with negative numbers
    return int(val+0.5);
}

) to obtain your result.


Edit

By the way, I didn't notice that even the exponential distribution is already included in <random> (link)... well, even better, you don't need to write the code, but a little bit of theory is never wasted :).

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