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While describing a class, how to know when function has to be virtual?

I know what virtual function means, but I just can't figure out when I should make them virtual

Thanks

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If you think about virtual keyword in your class, start with that destructor should be virtual. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Mar 14 '11 at 9:35
    
@Kirill V. Lyadvinsky, not always: blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2004/05/07/127826.aspx :) –  VextoR Mar 14 '11 at 11:04
    
the article doesn't say anything agains my statement. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Mar 14 '11 at 12:29
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Functions should be virtual if you want to invoke them polymorphically. In other words, virtual function express behavior that can be customized in subclasses. For instance, consider the following class:

class Car {
public:
    const std::string & getId() const;
    virtual void startEngine() = 0;
private:
    std::string id;
}

Every car has an Id, and there is no customization allowed here, so there is no point in making it virtual. Subclasses should not be able to modify that property. How the engine is started however, depends on the specific car, and can in fact not be defined globally. But we do know that every car has to start the engine before we can drive, so we define it as a pure virtual function.

An important guideline for when to make a function virtual, and when not, is given by the Non-Virtual Interface idiom.

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thank you. In this example, we have to inherit the class because of pure virtual func. But if we make "void startEngine() {};" it should work anyway, right? –  VextoR Mar 14 '11 at 9:51
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Whether your class is going to have virtual functions depends on whether the class is going to be used as a base class, and that should depend on the design and architecture.

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It depends on whether there is a possibility that the derived classes can have a different functionality for the member function present in base class. Taking the design of a Polygon class -

class Polygon
{
    public:
    virtual float area();
    virtual ~Polygon(){};  // Since Polygon is a polymorphic class, it destructor needs to be virtual.
};

member function Polygon::area() needs to be virutal. Why ? Because the calculation of area for all the polygon isn't the same.

class Rectangle : public Polygon
{
    public:
    float area()
    {
         // area = 2* (length+breadth) ;
    }
};

Similarly -

class Square : public Polygon
{
    public:
    float area()
    {
         // area = side*side;
    }
};

Notice that Square, Rectangle are a type of Polygon but the calculation of area is not the same for both. In such cases of design, where a member function has the possibility of different implementation in derived class, it needs to be virtual in the base class.

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Thanks. But this code should work without "virtual" anyway... –  VextoR Mar 14 '11 at 9:43
    
@VextoR - Why do you think so. What if static type of operand is different from it's dynamic type ? Polygon *obj = new Square; –  Mahesh Mar 14 '11 at 9:46
    
thanks, I see now –  VextoR Mar 14 '11 at 9:53
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You need to make functions virtual if you want to use your objects through a pointer or reference to a base class. You can then call the derived class' function, without knowing exactly what type it is.

If you use each class separately, and know the type of each object, you don't need virtual functions even if you use derived classes.

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In terms of Software Design, if you are trying to define and Abstract Class or Interface, you will be using virtual keyword to enforce dynamic polymorphism.

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When you want your class to be treated as base class of some other class, and you think that there are some functions in your class which the derived classes might override, then it's good indication that you should make these functions virtual. Making them virtual enables runtime polymorphism! That means, you can use the classes polymorphically, i.e using pointer/reference of type base class, but pointing to derived class object!

In short, in interface based class design, one should make functions virtual.

Always remember one thing: Must not forget to make the base class destructor virtual when designing polymorphic classes!

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You should make the method virtual when you know that the method's behavior may or is going to change in classes inheriting from that class. More precisely, if you want a subclass to overwrite that method, then make it virtual. If you do not want to implement that method in your base class, then make it pure virtual: I.e.:

virtual void f() = 0;

This way your base class cannot be instantiated (you may not want it instantiated as it still has unimplemented methods left).

Using virtual methods you can have class polymorphism working for you.

If you know that a certain method is not going to change in behavior, then don't make it virtual (looking up virtual function calls takes longer than "final"/non-virtual function calls).

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