Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for an efficient way to left-shift a tuple.

What I've done so far:

def leftShift(tup, n):
    length = len(tup)
    if length != 0:
        n = n % length
    else:
        return tuple()
    return tup[n:] + tup[0:n]

sample = (1,2,3,4)
sample2 = ()

print(leftShift(sample, 5)) #prints (2, 3, 4, 1)
print(leftShift(sample, 1)) #prints (2, 3, 4, 1)
print(leftShift(sample, 15)) #prints (4, 1, 2, 3)
print(leftShift(sample, 3)) #prints (4, 1, 2, 3)
print(leftShift(sample2, 4)) #prints ()

The number of places to shift is given as the second argument.

Is it efficient? Can it be coded in more Pythonic way?

And tell me, is it...

length = len(tup)
if length != 0:
    n = n % length

more efficient than

if len(tup) != 0:
    n = n % len(tup)

?

I mean, is len(tup) O(1) or should I remember it for later usage?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you're doing is absolute micro-optimization, which is a total waste of time if you don't know exactly what you're aiming for.

The first version of you code is probably faster because it uses one less function call, but both are fine. If you really care about speed you should figure out how to use a profiler and the timeit module first.

len(tup) takes constant time.

Maybe you want a deque which has a rotate method?

Here are some alternatives:

def leftShift1(tup, n):
    try:
        n = n % len(tup)
    except ZeroDivisionError:
        return tuple()
    return tup[n:] + tup[0:n]

def leftShift2(tup, n):
    length = len(tup)
    if length != 0:
        n = n % length
    else:
        return tuple()
    return tup[n:] + tup[0:n]

def leftShift3(tup, n):
    if len(tup) != 0:
        n = n % len(tup)
    else:
        return tuple()
    return tup[n:] + tup[0:n] 

def leftShift4(tup, n):
    if tup:
        n = n % len(tup)
    else:
        return tuple()
    return tup[n:] + tup[0:n]

sample= tuple(range(10))

random timeit results

D:\downloads>python -m timeit -s"from asd import *" "leftShift1(sample, 20)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.472 usec per loop

D:\downloads>python -m timeit -s"from asd import *" "leftShift2(sample, 20)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.533 usec per loop

D:\downloads>python -m timeit -s"from asd import *" "leftShift3(sample, 20)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.582 usec per loop

D:\downloads>python -m timeit -s"from asd import *" "leftShift4(sample, 20)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.474 usec per loop

So:

  • The most Pythonic code (try .. except and if tup:) is the fastest. Gotta love Python for that.
  • You can save the incredible amount of 0.0000001 seconds.
share|improve this answer
    
Today I'm particularly interested in tuples as they are immutable and I can use them as keys in a dictionary. –  Maciej Ziarko Mar 14 '11 at 13:35
    
OK, so I will have to start looking for weak points in other parts of my program. Thanks! –  Maciej Ziarko Mar 14 '11 at 14:03
    
Profile, profile, profile –  Justin Peel Mar 14 '11 at 17:59

A little more tersely

def leftShift(tup, n):
    if not tup or not n:
        return tup
    n %= len(tup)
    return tup[n:] + tup[:n]
share|improve this answer
    
+1. You made it much more readable. Thanks for your answer. :) –  Maciej Ziarko Mar 14 '11 at 14:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.