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I need to combine three images the way I represent in attached file:

enter image description here

1) One image is background. It is 'solid' in sense it has no alpha channel.

2) Another one is sprite. Sprite lies upon background. Sprite may have its own alpha channel, background has to be visible in places where sprite is transparent.

3) There's a number of masks: I apply new mask to Sprite every frame. Mask isn't rectangular.

In other words, visible pixel = pixel of background, if cropping mask corresponding color is white OR sprite is transparent; pixel of sprite otherwise (for example, corresponding mask's pixel is black).

I'm working with cocos2d-iphone. Can I make such combination with cocos2d-iphone or with OpenGL ES 1.1? If any answer is YES, working code would be appreciated. If both answers is NO, is there another technology on iOS to make what I want (maybe Quartz2d or OpenGL ES 2.0) ?

Mask format is not obligatory black for Sprite and white for Background. I can make Mask of required format, such as transparency for Background and white for Sprite if needed.

P.S. There's another unanswered question of same kind: Possible to change the alpha value of certain pixels on iPhone?

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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is my answer for OpenGL. The procedure would be very different for Quartz. The actual code is pretty simple, but getting it exactly right is the tricky part. I am using a GL context that is 1024X1024 with the origin in the bottom left. I'm not posting my code because it uses immediate mode which isn't available in OpenGL|ES. If you want my drawing code, let me know and I'll update my answer.

  1. Draw the mask with blending disabled.
  2. Enable blending, set the GLBlendFunc(GL_DST_COLOR, GL_ZERO) and draw the bleed through texture. My mask is white where it should bleed through. In your question it was black.
  3. Now to draw the background, set the blend function to glBlendFunc(GL_ONE_MINUS_DST_COLOR, GL_DST_COLOR) and draw the background texture.

EDIT Here is the code I describe above. Please note that this will not work on iOS since there is no immediate mode, but you should be able to get this working in Macintosh project. Once that is working you can convert it to something iOS compatible in the Macintosh project and then move that code over to your iOS project.

The renderMask() call is where the most interesting part is. renderTextures() draws the sample textures in the top row.

static GLuint color_texture;
static GLuint mask_texture;
static GLuint background_texture;

static float window_size[2];

void renderMask()
{
float texture_x=0, texture_y=0;
float x=0, y=0;

{
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, mask_texture);

    glDisable(GL_BLEND);
    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x+512.0,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x+512.0,y+512.0);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x,y+512.0);
    glEnd();
}

{
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, color_texture);
    glEnable(GL_BLEND);
    glBlendFunc(GL_DST_COLOR, GL_ZERO);
    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x+512.0,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x+512.0,y+512.0);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x,y+512.0);
    glEnd();
}

{   
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, background_texture);
    glEnable(GL_BLEND);
    glBlendFunc(GL_ONE_MINUS_DST_COLOR, GL_DST_COLOR);
    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x+512.0,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x+512.0,y+512.0);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x,y+512.0);
    glEnd();
}
}

// Draw small versions of the textures.
void renderTextures()
{
float texture_x=0, texture_y=0;
float x=0, y=532.0;
float size = 128;

{
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, mask_texture);

    glDisable(GL_BLEND);
    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x+size,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x+size,y+size);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x,y+size);
    glEnd();
}

{
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, color_texture);
    x = size + 16;

    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x+size,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x+size,y+size);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x,y+size);
    glEnd();
}

{
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, background_texture);
    x = size*2 + 16*2;
    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y);
        glVertex2f(x+size,y);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x+1.0,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x+size,y+size);

        glTexCoord2f(texture_x,texture_y+1.0);
        glVertex2f(x,y+size);
    glEnd();
}
}

void init()
{
GLdouble bounds[4];

glGetDoublev(GL_VIEWPORT, bounds);

window_size[0] = bounds[2];
window_size[1] = bounds[3];

glClearColor(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0);

glShadeModel(GL_SMOOTH);

// Load our textures...
color_texture = [[NSImage imageNamed:@"colors"] texture];
mask_texture = [[NSImage imageNamed:@"mask"] texture];
background_texture = [[NSImage imageNamed:@"background"] texture];


// Enable alpha blending.  We'll learn more about this later
glEnable(GL_BLEND);

glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);
}

void draw()
{
glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

glColor3f(1.0, 1.0, 1.0);

renderMask();
renderTextures();
}

void reshape(int width, int height)
{
glViewport(0, 0, width, height);

glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadIdentity();
gluOrtho2D(0.0, width, 0.0, height);
glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);

window_size[0] = width;
window_size[1] = height;
}

This shows the my three textures drawn normally (crop, bleed through, and background) and then combined below.

image

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Seems it's not working :( Just imagine black spot on Sprite: after 2) we would got two types of black - black of black spot on Sprite and black of unmasked area. ON 3) Background will appear everywhere DST_COLOR is BLACK. –  Oleg Trakhman Mar 14 '11 at 16:39
    
I mean BLACK pixels of sprite, if they are within mask, should remain BLACK, not background. –  Oleg Trakhman Mar 14 '11 at 16:42
    
The mask needs to be white where it is bleeding through. The blending in step 2 multiplies the mask color value by the value for the bleed through texture. if the mask is black (0,0,0) the result of the multiplication is zero. So your cropping_mask.png needs to be white in the pentagon and transparent outside the pentagon. –  Mark Mar 14 '11 at 16:46
    
I know, after 2nd step what i will get my sprite, cropped by mask on a black background, yes? –  Oleg Trakhman Mar 14 '11 at 17:04
1  
I beg pardon, but if Sprite has a black pixel, covered by mask, then after 2) I'd have cropped Sprite, on black background, right? After 3) I have background everywhere on black pixels, right? After that, black pixel of my sprite become colored. It just doesn't work, I tried a much blending schemes but they all seems not appropriate for my case. Problem is that glBlend always combines 2 textures, but i need three. Is there something other then blending? –  Oleg Trakhman Mar 15 '11 at 4:53
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Please note that -- the above answer gives a fantastic example of how to actually do this using OpenGL.

However, for anyone reading this question. It is good to realise that there is a everyday technology available to completely and totally do this WITHOUT using OpenGL in any way.

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/GraphicsImaging/Conceptual/drawingwithquartz2d/dq_images/dq_images.html

Apple technology is built to do exactly what you describe from the ground up - the page above will introduce you to the technology! Set aside "cocos" and so on for now. Enjoy.

Again, just to be clear: this is an absolutely normal, everyday, bit of programming on the iPhone that all iPhone programmers do a few times a day! heh! There is utterly no need, to ever use OpenGL for something like this.

Here is an excellent analogy:

It would be like if you decided to write machine code from scratch, to get text on the screen, rather than just using Apple's text systems!! It would be incredibly unnecessary.

Again - the answer above explains nicely how to do this in OpenGL, as an exercise. But I am emphasising here -- for people new to the platform -- that this process is completely normal and you do it "everyday" just using the normal Apple tools, in one or two lines of code. Similarly, you would never, ever "make text" from scratch, you just use the Apple text systems, of course.

Again - I am just pointing that out in this answer. Hopefully this will help clarify the situation, for any readers new to the platform!

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My whole game is written on OpenGL/Cocos2d, I write some special effects, such as old TV noise and exploding sprite (sprite explodes to number of triangle pieces) on OpenGL. Do I really have to rewrite it all to support Quartz2D? –  Oleg Trakhman Mar 14 '11 at 14:09
    
I don't completely reject Quartz2D: I only prefer OpenGL/Cocos2d as technologies I know a little. Joe, is it possible to mix OpenGL and Quartz2d? –  Oleg Trakhman Mar 14 '11 at 16:09
2  
Quartz makes things faster to write and easier to debug, but since you are further removed from the graphics hardware it is significantly slower. –  Mark Nov 9 '11 at 15:02
    
The mask in opengl should computer much faster than in quartz... –  PsychoDad Jan 15 '13 at 2:26
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