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Can anyone point me the differences b/w jquery event.stopPropagation() and event.stopImmediatePropagation() methods(possibly with example)?

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8  
Did you read the documentation? –  SLaks Mar 14 '11 at 14:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 78 down vote accepted

stopPropagation will prevent any parent handlers from being executed while stopImmediatePropagation will do the same but also prevent other handlers from executing.

Quick example from the jquery documentation:

$("p").click(function(event){
  event.stopImmediatePropagation();
});
$("p").click(function(event){
  // This function won't be executed
  $(this).css("background-color", "#f00");
});  
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check example at this link(jsfiddle.net/jGJRY/3). Ideally, It only "alert1" handler should be executed. but both the handlers are getting executed. while the example at tutorialspoint.com/cgi-bin/practice.cgi?file=jquery_107 is working fine. –  Arjun Mar 14 '11 at 14:52
4  
@Arjun: You are using live which works differently. Read the documentation: api.jquery.com/live and the comments here api.jquery.com/event.stopImmediatePropagation –  Felix Kling Mar 14 '11 at 15:06
    
will do the same but also prevent other handlers from executing ..... which other handlers ? the same handler types ? click will stop click . but will it stop - for example dblclick ? –  Royi Namir Feb 19 '13 at 16:28
    
@RoyiNamir It will keep any additional handlers on an element from being executed. See api.jquery.com/event.stopImmediatePropagation for full details. –  Dave Mar 19 '13 at 16:16

From the jQuery API:

In addition to keeping any additional handlers on an element from being executed, this method also stops the bubbling by implicitly calling event.stopPropagation(). To simply prevent the event from bubbling to ancestor elements but allow other event handlers to execute on the same element, we can use event.stopPropagation() instead.

Use event.isImmediatePropagationStopped() to know whether this method was ever called (on that event object).

In short: event.stopPropagation() allows other handlers on the same element to be executed, while event.stopImmediatePropagation() prevents every event from running.

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Added a small example on jsfiddle to demonstrate how both these propagation stoppages work.

There are three event handlers bound. If we don’t stop any propagation, then there should be four alerts - three on the child div, and one on the parent div.

If we stop the event from propagating, then there will be 3 alerts (all on the inner child div). Since the event won’t propagate up the DOM hierarchy, the parent div won’t see it, and its handler won’t fire.

If we stop propagation immediately, then there will only be 1 alert. Even though there are three event handlers attached to the inner child div, only 1 is executed and any further propagation is killed immediately, even within the same element.

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event.stopPropagation will prevent handlers on parent elements from running.
Calling event.stopImmediatePropagation will also prevent other handlers on the same element from running.

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6  
Worth mentioning is that event handlers are executed in the order in which they have been attached to the element. –  Felix Kling Mar 14 '11 at 14:15

event.stopPropagation() allows other handlers on the same element to be executed, while event.stopImmediatePropagation() prevents every event from running. For example, see below jQuery code block.

$("p").click(function(event)
{ event.stopImmediatePropagation();
});
$("p").click(function(event)
{ // This function won't be executed 
$(this).css("color", "#fff7e3");
});

If event.stopPropagation was used in previous example, then the next click event on p element which changes the css will fire, but in case event.stopImmediatePropagation(), the next p click event will not fire.

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