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I recent read again the beautiful intro to recursion in the 'simply scheme' book (here's the link to the relevant chapter), where this recursive procedure is introduced (in the scheme language):

(define (downup wd)
  (if (= (count wd) 1)
      (se wd)
      (se wd (downup (bl wd)) wd)))

> (downup 'toe)
(TOE TO T TO TOE)

> (downup 'banana)
(BANANA BANAN BANA BAN BA B BA BAN BANA BANAN BANANA)

I tried to translate that procedure into python, which I use in my day job. Here's the result:

def recursivefun(word):
    if len(word) == 1: 
        return word
    else:
        x = []
        x.append(word)
        x.extend(recursivefun(word[1:]))
        x.append(word)
        return x

print recursivefun("ciao")
# ==> ['ciao', 'iao', 'ao', 'o', 'ao', 'iao', 'ciao']

So my question is: is there a better way to represent this recursive procedure in python? Or maybe a more 'elegant' way?

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I just noticed that downup in your example chops of letters at the end, whereas recursivefun chops off letters from the front. Is that difference intentional? –  Davy8 Mar 14 '11 at 15:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to closely represent the original recursive Scheme function:

def downup(word):
    if len(word) <= 1:
        return [word]
    return [word] + downup(s[1:]) + [word]

Note that your own function returns a string if the length of the passed in string is 1 and a list otherwise. This could lead to surprising behaviour. Try

def recursivefun(word):
    if len(word) == 2:
        return word
    else:
        x = []
        x.append(word)
        x.extend(recursivefun(word[1:]))
        x.append(word)
        return x

print recursivefun("banana")

for example, which prints

['banana', 'anana', 'nana', 'ana', 'n', 'a', 'ana', 'nana', 'anana', 'banana']

which might be different from what you expected.

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+1 for helping me understand the Scheme version (and also just a overall elegant solution) –  Davy8 Mar 14 '11 at 15:02
    
thanks a lot what you pointed out is really useful! btw in your 'translation' above you used both 's' and 'word' to represent the same variable .. you might wanna change that! –  magicrebirth Mar 14 '11 at 15:05
    
@magicrebirth: Thanks, fixed. –  Sven Marnach Mar 14 '11 at 15:08

Refactored:

def recursivefun(word):
  if len(word) == 1: 
    return [word]
  else:
    return [word] + recursivefun(word[1:]) + [word]

Keep in mind we had to return [word] in the first branch because when you concatenate recursivefun() on line 5, it expects a list.

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It is possible to work with strings instead of lists:

def downup(wd):
    if len(wd) == 1:
        return wd

    return ' '.join([wd, downup(wd[:-1]), wd])

print downup("TOE")
print downup("BANANA")

prints

TOE TO T TO TOE
BANANA BANAN BANA BAN BA B BA BAN BANA BANAN BANANA
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And just for comparision it in list comprehension:

w ='BANANA'
print('('+' '.join(w[:n] for n in list(range(len(w)+1,1,-1)) + list(range(1,len(w)+1)))+')')

==>

(BANANA BANAN BANA BAN BA B BA BAN BANA BANAN BANANA)

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