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I have four flags

Current = 0x1  
Past = 0x2  
Future = 0x4  
All = 0x7

Say I receive the two flags Past and Future (setFlags(PAST | FUTURE)). How can I tell if Past is in it? Likewise how can I tell that Current is not in it? That way I don't have to test for every possible combination.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 27 down vote accepted

If you want all bits in the test mask to match:

if((value & mask) == mask) {...}

If you want any single bit in the test mask to match:

if((value & mask) != 0) {...}

The difference is most apparent when you are testing a value for multiple things.

To test for exclusion:

if ((value & mask) == 0) { }
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Would you give an example with the ~? –  Malfist Feb 9 '09 at 21:48
    
Actually, might not be needed - updatd –  Marc Gravell Feb 9 '09 at 21:49

First of all - use enums with FlagAttribute. That's what it's for.

[Flags]
public enum Time
{
    None = 0
    Current = 1,
    Past = 2,
    Future = 4
    All = 7
}

Testing then is done like this:

if ( (x & Time.Past) != 0 )

Or this:

if ( (x & Time.Past) == Time.Past )

The latter will work better if "Past" was a combination of flags and you wanted to test them all.

Setting is like this:

x |= Time.Past;

Unsetting is like this:

x &= ~Time.Past;
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Correct me if I'm wrong, I think 1 is not appropriate to be used as flag value? As any flag value (& Operator) with 1, result is still 1. –  Roylee Jan 17 '13 at 15:58
1  
@Roylee - not, that's a perfectly normal flag value. It corresponds to exactly one bit. And think about it - for example 4 & 1 = 0. –  Vilx- Jan 17 '13 at 18:24
    
Icic. got it :) Then you got to make sure the rest of the flag value sets are power of 2, right? –  Roylee Jan 17 '13 at 19:26
1  
@Roylee - Exactly! :) Note that "None" and "All" are a bit different - they're not flags themselves, but rather combinations of flags. I could also make PastOrPresent=3 because 1 & 2 = 3. It only makes sense to add these for combinations that are often used together. It saves typing and avoids mistakes. –  Vilx- Jan 18 '13 at 9:08
1  
@Roylee - Aww, hell. I made a typo. It's supposed to be 1 | 2 = 3. :) –  Vilx- Jan 19 '13 at 8:31

You may also want to add an extension method like this

  enum states {
     Current = 0x1,
     Past = 0x2,
     Future = 0x4,
     All = 0x7
  };

  static bool Is(this states current, states value) {
     return (current & value) == value;
  }

then you can do:

 if(state.Is(states.Past)) {
    // Past
 }
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if ((flags & PAST) == PAST)
{
  // PAST is there
}

if ((flags & CURRENT) != CURRENT)
{
  // CURRENT is not there
}
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A shame it is wrong (doesn't compile)... in C# you need brackets around the (flags & CURRENT) –  Marc Gravell Feb 9 '09 at 21:42
3  
@Marc Gravell, why would you post this comment and not edit the post for the guy? –  Simucal Feb 13 '09 at 16:52
(value & Current) == Current
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An addendum to the Marc Gravell and Vilx-...

Your flagged enum shouldn't specify the amount for "All", it should just include your existing values. This goes for all calculated values.

[Flags]
public enum Time
{
    None = 0
    Current = 1,
    Past = 2,
    Future = 4,
    All = Current | Past | Future
}

Note that Vilx- removed the use of Hexadecimal for values. This is important because once you past 0x8 your values will have to comply with Hex. You should just stay in decimal.

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you could use AND on it and check if the result is the same as you and with?

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