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Using the following script to add an event listener, basically it says "Hide the #curtain div (whole page) until .bgImage is downloaded, then wait 1500ms and fade everything in"

My question is this - sometimes due to server lag or glitchy triggering of .bind("load") the page is not fading in. How can I add some kind of timeOut to the effect so that it triggers after X miliseconds if the .bind("load) event is not triggered?

$(document).ready(function(){

// #curtain DIV begins hidden then fades in after .bgImage (curtain) is loaded - prevents "ribbon" loading effect in Chrome

$('#curtain').hide();
$(".bgImage").bind("load", function () {$('#curtain').delay(1500).fadeIn(); });

});
share|improve this question
    
You could try to simply use setTimeout(function(){$('#curtain').fadeIn();}); – ChrisH Mar 14 '11 at 15:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you could do is this:

var url = $('.bgImage').attr('src');
var img = new Image();
img.onload = function() {
  $('#curtain').delay(1500).fadeIn();
};
img.src = url;

In my experience, as long as you set up the "onload" property of an "Image" object before you set the "src", the handler will always run.

edit — if you wanted to be sure that the thing would eventually fade in, then you could do something like this:

var allDone = false;
var url = $('.bgImage').attr('src');
var img = new Image();
img.onload = function() {
  if (!allDone) {
    $('#curtain').delay(1500).fadeIn();
    allDone = true;
  }
};
setTimeout(img.onload, 5000); // show the hidden stuff after 5 seconds, image or no image
img.src = url;
share|improve this answer
2  
great suggestion - but due to unpredictable server load times I still need to set some kind of timeOut - your code seems to be less glitchy than my previous, but can you add some kind of "max delay" or timeOut to the delay on the fade in effect and edit your sample code accordingly? – Brian Mar 14 '11 at 15:53
    
OK I think I know what you mean ... – Pointy Mar 14 '11 at 17:09
    
+1 for "as long as you set up the "onload" property of an "Image" object before you set the "src", the handler will always run." – foxybagga Dec 26 '11 at 8:48
$(".bgImage").bind("load", function () {
    setTimeout(function() {
        $('#curtain').delay(1500).fadeIn();
    }, 500);
});

if you want to add a delay to the fadeIn animation this will help. cheers

share|improve this answer

You can use something like this:

var timeout;
$(".bgImage").bind("load", function(){
  clearTimeout(timeout);
  // do something here
});
timeout = setTimeout(function(){
  $(".bgImage").unbind("load");
  // do something else instead
}, 10000);

and maybe also handle errors:

$(".bgImage").bind("error", function(){
  // do something else here as well
});

UPDATE: I added code to cancel your timeout when the load does happen. Those two functions has to be able to cancel out each other.

share|improve this answer

Try adding this to your css:

#curtain {
display:none;
}

and using this in your document read():

$(.bgImage).load(function() {
    $('#curtain').fadeIn(3000);
});
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