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I am trying to use templates recursively to define (at compile-time) a d-tuple of doubles. The code below compiles fine with Visual Studio 2010, but g++ fails and complains that it "cannot call constructor 'point<1>::point' directly".

Could anyone please shed some light on what is going on here?

Many thanks, Jo

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

using namespace std;

template <const int N>
class point
{

private:
  pair<double, point<N-1> > coordPointPair;

public:

  point()
  {
    coordPointPair.first = 0;
    coordPointPair.second.point<N-1>::point();
  }

};

template<>
class point<1>
{

private:
  double coord;

public:

  point()
  {
    coord= 0;
  }

};

int main()
{
  point<5> myPoint;

  return 0; 
}
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What are you trying to do with:

coordPointPair.second.point<N-1>::point();

It looks like you want to explicitly call the point default constructor - which has already been called when the pair was constructed. You cannot call constructors directly (unless you use placement new, which wouldn't make sense in this scenario)

Just remove that line.

If you for some reason want to overwrite the already constructed .second by assigning to it from a temporary point<N-1> you can do so with coordPointPair.second = point<N-1>();.

If you, for a more complex case, want to pass arguments to a point constructor you can do this in the initializer list:

point(your_type your_arg) : 
    coordPointPair(
        pair<double, point<N-1> >(0.0, point<N-1>(your_arg_here))
    )
{
}
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MAny thanks -- this clarifies my confusion/misunderstanding. –  Johannes Mar 15 '11 at 20:17
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The simplest solution is to use the initialization list :

template <const int N>
class point
{

private:
  pair<double, point<N-1> > coordPointPair;

public:

  point() : coordPointPair( std::make_pair( 0.0, point<N-1>() ) )
  {
  }

};

What you implemented there is not c++ standard compliant. If you still want to initialize in the constructor, then do it like this :

coordPointPair.second = point<N-1>();
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I would remove the make_pair call. Just use the two argument pair constructor. –  aschepler Mar 14 '11 at 16:07
    
@aschepler Me too, but that example might be simplified in order to demonstrate the problem. The real constructor for point<N> might be more complex and even take arguments –  BЈовић Mar 14 '11 at 16:09
    
Yes, you're right -- this is a simplified example; the real constructor does indeed take arguments. –  Johannes Mar 15 '11 at 20:18
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coordPointPair.second.point<N-1>::point();

This is illegal. You wanted to do this:

coordPointPair.second = point<N-1>();

By the way, it's not needed, because by the time this statement executes, the coordPointPair.second is already initialized with point<N-1>().

However, if there is any non-default constructor in point<>, then you can do this:

coordPointPair.second = point<N-1>(/*arg, ...*/); //pass the arguments

But again, it's better if you do this in the initialization-list!

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