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As the title says, I need to write a small program to read data from standard input, sort it, and send it to standard output. The program should take 1 argument that tells it how long is one record (in bytes). Here's how I test it:

printf 'D\x00C\x00\x00B\x00A' | ./binsort 2 | od -c

The above should output something like:

0000000  \0   A  \0   B   C  \0   D  \0
0000010

Here's what I have so far (binsort.c):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <limits.h>

using namespace std;


void print_usage()
{
        printf("%s\n", "Usage: ");
}


int compare (const void * a, const void * b) // the compare function for qsort... might need some work
{
  return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b );
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
        if (argc != 2 || stdin == NULL) // check for argument and piped input
        {
                print_usage();
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }

        int entry_size = atoi(argv[1]);

        if (entry_size <= 0 || entry_size >= INT_MAX) // check for valid range of entry size
        {
                print_usage();
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }

        char *input = new char[entry_size]; // to hold single record

        while (fgets(input, entry_size, stdin) != NULL)
        {
                printf("%s", input); // output single record we just read
        }

        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

Then compile with g++ binsort.c -o binsort.

The above compiles but doesn't output the data that printf sent to it. It should output it in 2-byte chunks... like D\0 C\0 \0B \0A... but it doesn't.

I'm thinking of using qsort to do the sorting on a malloc/realloc-allocated array. However, I never had experience with these, in effect banging my head on this little utility for a few days. Anyone can help?

P.S. People asked if this is a homework assignment... It's not - developers at my company want to use this to debug output of their project.

share|improve this question
    
Homework, perchance? –  dmckee Feb 9 '09 at 21:47
    
Not homework - developers at my company want to use this to debug output of their project. –  DV. Feb 9 '09 at 21:53
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Don't use scanf() and printf(). Those are supposed to be used with text data. Since you're dealing with binary data, you instead want to use the lower-level fread() and fwrite() functions. Since you don't know how much total data there is, you'll have to use a dynamic data structure (such as a resizeable array) to store the input. You can't process the data on-line -- you have to read it all in, sort it, then write it back out. Your sort function is also wrong -- you're only comparing the first 4 bytes of each record, which is wrong if the record size is anything other than 4 bytes. Use memcmp() instead.

This should work:

char *input = NULL;
size_t input_size = 0;
int num_items = 0;
int entry_size;

int compare_func(const void *e1, const void *e2)
{
  return memcmp(e1, e2, entry_size);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
   // ...
  char *datum = malloc(entry_size);  // check for NULL
  input_size = 4096;
  input = malloc(input_size);  // check for NULL

  while(1)
  {
    if(fread(datum, 1, entry_size, stdin) < entry_size)
      break;
    size_t new_size = (num_items + 1) * entry_size;
    if(new_size > input_size)
    {
      input = realloc(input, input_size * 2);  // check for NULL
      input_size *= 2;
    }
    memcpy(input + num_items * entry_size, datum, entry_size);
    num_items++;
  }

  qsort(input, num_items, entry_size, compare_func);

  fwrite(input, entry_size, num_items, stdout);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not doubling the buffer size on realloc may save a lengthy and unnecessary explanation, but it is making my hands itch. –  dmckee Feb 9 '09 at 22:26
    
elaborate please? –  DV. Feb 9 '09 at 22:32
    
By doubling when you resize the buffer (i.e. input) you guarantee amortized O(n) coping costs. The worst case for extend-only-as-needed expansions is O(n^2). Probably not an issue here (because the buffer is the only thing using the heap), but important in other cases. –  dmckee Feb 9 '09 at 22:45
    
In the above you would write something like: int temp = input_size ? input_size*2 : entry_size; input = realloc(input, temp); input_size = temp; which is much less clear the first time you see it. –  dmckee Feb 9 '09 at 22:49
    
Fixed; I was thinking about that while writing it, but it slipped my mind. –  Adam Rosenfield Feb 9 '09 at 22:51
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fgets and fprintf deal with strings (which in C are char-arrays ending with the special character \0).

Use fread and fwrite for binary data. qsort is good, except your compare function needs to compare byte by byte for entry_size bytes, not just cast from void to int, which is unsafe and probably incorrect.

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printf interprets \0 in your stream as terminating character.

Use read() and write() instead:

    int res;
    int count;
    while (1) {
            count = 0;
            while(count < entry_size) {
                    res = read(STDIN_FILENO, input + count, entry_size - count);
                    if (res <= 0)
                            exit(errno);
                    count += res;
            }
            count = 0;
            while(res) {
                    res = write(STDOUT_FILENO, input + count, entry_size - count);
                    if (res < 0)
                            exit(errno);
                    count += res;
            }
    }
share|improve this answer
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A couple of points that might help (I'm assuming that this is homework, so this has a pedagogical structure):

  • You are going to need to stick the data somewhere while you're accumulating it. And since you don't know how much is coming, dynamic allocation is going to be necessary. Lots of choices here: dynamic arrays, linked lists, hash tables, etc. ad nauseum... Pick one that will work for you (see below).

  • Once you've got it, you're going to need to sort it. Or, you could store it sorted in the first place. Do you happen to know a data structure that can manage that?

  • Once it is sorted, you just spit it out the other end.

Easy, no?


Apropos the comment:

  • Do you have K&R? Or some other basic text on c or c++? You'll want one. And you want to pick one language or the other and stick with it. If you are used to OO programing in another context use c++. If you don't know either, use c++.

  • If you're using c++, the STL container will take care of the dynamic storage for you. The simplest thing would be to use a std::vector<char[2]> (using the size from the command line argument), and invoke the <algorithm> sort on it.

  • Other people have pointed out that you need to do binary IO. This is important, because neither your input nor your output are structured like text IO.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for suggestions. I tries using a sorted set (set.h) but don't know how to make it accept input from fgets(). Besides, I'm guessing qsort could do a faster job on a large input. My biggest issue is to figure out how to properly use all the char*, char**, &char, etc. that these functions want. –  DV. Feb 9 '09 at 21:57
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P.S. People asked if this is a homework assignment... It's not - developers at my company want to use this to debug output of their project.

If it's not homework, and this is under Linux, why not use the included "sort" program?

E.g.:

% printf 'D\x00C\x00\x00B\x00A' | sort -z | od -c
0000000  \0   A  \0   B  \0   C  \0   D  \0
0000011

FSF/GNU sort offers the -z option:

-z, --zero-terminated
        end lines with 0 byte, not newline



Amended to add:

Okay, seeing as of how you still want your own code...

And seeing as of how no one else has yet posted an STL-based approach.

Note the use of struct FUNCTOR for the comparison (via stl::sort()). And, if you want, you could always use ostream_iterator<string>(cout, "\n") instead to make things a little more human-readable..

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

   /* ifstream won't set EOF-state until we try to read past the end-of-file.*/
   /* (Makes for lots of grief trying to read in files...)                   */
inline bool
IsStreamStillGood( istream & theStream )
{
  return theStream && (theStream . peek() != EOF);
}

template<class TYPE> inline void DELETE( TYPE * x)
{
  delete x;
  x = (TYPE *) NULL;
}

struct FUNCTOR
{
  bool operator()(const string & x, const string & y) { return x < y; }
};


int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  istream *       stream;
  vector<string>  v;

  UASSERT( argc, >, 1 );

  const int recordSize = atoi( argv[1] );
  char      buffer [ recordSize + 1 ];

  UASSERT( recordSize, >, 0 );


  if ( argc > 2 )
    stream = new ifstream( argv[2] );
  else
    stream = & cin;


  while ( IsStreamStillGood( * stream ) )
  {
    stream-> read( buffer, recordSize );
    v.push_back( string( buffer, stream->gcount() ) );
  }

  UASSERT( v.back().size(), ==, size_t(recordSize) );


  FUNCTOR functor;
  sort( v.begin(), v.end(), functor );

  copy( v.begin(), v.end(), ostream_iterator<string>(cout) );


  if ( argc > 2 )
    DELETE(stream);
}



Amended (again) to add:

Question regarding usage of strings in your STL approach: since there are potentially null characters ('\0') in the input, wouldn't strings get confused because of that? Someone suggested using char[] but I suspect the same problem would arise

If I have char c[10];, I'm free to say c[0] = '\0';. Same for c[1] or c[9]. I can have as many null characters in that array as I want. (Subject to the size of the array, of course.)

Now, when using c as a c-string, the question arises as to how long it is. Is it 1 character long or 9? Normally, in C, this is decided by where the first NULL character appears.

So things like printf(%s), scanf(%s), strncat(), strncpy(), strncmp(), etc aren't really happy with NULL ('\0') characters embedded within our binary data array.

But C++ std::string keeps track of the length independently. At least it seems to, and it permits things like: myString.append( 10, '\0' );

So, by using stream->read(buffer,recordSize) we read in a set number of chars (bytes). We don't really care whether they are nulls ('\0') or not. It's all good. Just give me recordSize number of bytes.

By creating with v.push_back(string(buffer, stream->gcount())), we push back a new string containing stream->gcount() chars (bytes). And again we don't care whether they are nulls ('\0') or not. We just need all stream->gcount() bytes.

Sort uses functor, which uses operator<(const string &, const string &), which uses string::compare(), which again will use the string's length and doesn't care about what data is actually contained in the string. Nulls ('\0') are just fine.

Now if we tried to use v.back().c_str(), well, then we have no length so the nulls would confuse us. But as long as we use the string object (e.g. v.back()) containing both data and length, we're good.

Which brings us to output. And again we are outputting the string, not myString.c_str(), so all the chars in the string are printed. Nulls ('\0') included.

share|improve this answer
    
Answer: because they want to have great flexibility in sorting. E.g., they will write their own compare_func() for qsort(). –  DV. Feb 9 '09 at 22:37
    
Thanks for the suggestions, though :) I could use these commands to test if my program works correctly. –  DV. Feb 9 '09 at 22:38
    
Ahh, you know about -k2,2n and -t, right? Sort IS pretty generic... –  Mr.Ree Feb 10 '09 at 0:20
    
Question regarding usage of strings in your STL approach: since there are potentially null characters ('\0') in the input, wouldn't strings get confused because of that? Someone suggested using char[] but I suspect the same problem would arise. –  DV. Feb 10 '09 at 20:41
    
Answered by amending original post. (Needed more than 300 chars.) –  Mr.Ree Feb 11 '09 at 0:05
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Thanks to all for great suggestions! Just for the record, here's completed binsort.c that does what is expected.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <cstring>
#include <limits.h>

using namespace std;


int num_items = 0;
size_t input_size = 0;
int entry_size = 0;


void print_usage()
{
        printf("%s\n", "Usage: <binary data> | ./binsort [RECORD_LENGTH]");
        printf("%s\n", "For example: printf 'D\\x00C\\x00\\x00B\\x00A' | ./binsort 2 | od -c");
}


int compare (const void * a, const void * b)
{
        return memcmp(a, b, entry_size);
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
        if (argc != 2 || stdin == NULL)
        {
                print_usage();
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }

        entry_size = atoi(argv[1]);

        if (entry_size <= 0 || entry_size >= INT_MAX)
        {
                print_usage();
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }

        char *input = NULL;
        char *datum = (char*) malloc(entry_size);
        if (datum == NULL)
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);

        while(1)
        {
                int read_size = fread(datum, 1, entry_size, stdin);

                if (read_size == 0)
                        break;

                if(read_size < entry_size)
                {
                        while(read_size < entry_size)
                        {
                                memcpy(datum, '\0', 1);
                                read_size++;
                        }
                        break;
                }

                size_t new_size = (num_items + 1) * entry_size;
                if(new_size > input_size)
                {
                        input = (char*) realloc(input, new_size);
                        if (input == NULL)
                                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
                        input_size = new_size;
                }
                memcpy(input + num_items * entry_size, datum, entry_size);
                num_items++;
        }

        qsort(input, num_items, entry_size, compare);

        fwrite(input, entry_size, num_items, stdout);

        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sure this will work. But you might look at my STL approach up above. While less efficient in terms of memory use, perhaps it might be easier to follow... –  Mr.Ree Feb 10 '09 at 1:53
    
Thanks! Yeah, I'll use STL approach next time :D Saves lots of effort until I learn all the memory management quirks of C. –  DV. Feb 10 '09 at 20:38
    
Saves lots of time even after you learn all the memory management quirks of C... ;-) –  Mr.Ree Feb 10 '09 at 23:26
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