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I have the following XPath 1.0 query:

/root/Nodes/*[self::CustomNode[not(../DefaultNode)]|self::DefaultNode]/Name

As I understand it, this will return /root/Nodes/CustomNode/Name if it exists, or /root/Nodes/DefaultNode/Name if it's not found. However, /root/Nodes/DefaultNode/Name is being returned even when /root/Nodes/CustomNode/Name is present. Any ideas how I can fix this?

DefaultNode nodes always proceed CustomNode nodes in the document order.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
This is a duplicate of How do I return a different node if the first node doesn't exist in an XPath Query? – user357812 Mar 14 '11 at 17:16
    
Your assumption is wrong because you have inverted the condition from my previus answer. If you want CustomNode or DefaultNode when the former doesn't exist, you should use this predicate [self::CustomNode|self::DefaultNode[not(../CustomNode)]] – user357812 Mar 14 '11 at 17:20
    
I see. That was the problem. Thank you. – Tom Mar 14 '11 at 17:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you thinking the vertical line (|) works like an OR?

Here's the details: http://www.w3schools.com/xpath/xpath_operators.asp

| Computes two node-sets: //book | //cd Returns a node-set with all book and cd elements

Semantics:
It returns nodes that meet condition A OR condition B.
It returns nodes that meet condition A AND nodes that meet condition B.

share|improve this answer
    
I see. I replaced the pipe with 'or', but it's still returning the default node. Any ideas? Thanks – Tom Mar 14 '11 at 17:09
    
Do note that the expression is inside a predicate. The effective boolean value of a node set is true unless it's empty. – user357812 Mar 14 '11 at 17:23

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